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  • 21 votes cast
Apr
28
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
27
comment An English idiom for “solve a problem that has been solved”?
That would be slightly different. A solution in search of a problem is a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
15
comment Is there an EBNF that covers all of English
There is a machine-readable dialect of English called Attempto Controlled English: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attempto_Controlled_English
Jul
11
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
28
comment Opposite of “literal”
Here's a comprehensive list of antonyms of "literal": thesaurus.com/browse/literal
Feb
25
awarded  Famous Question
Feb
18
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
9
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
15
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
22
accepted How can I distinguish between the singular and plural of “species”?
Jul
22
asked How can I distinguish between the singular and plural of “species”?
Jan
3
comment Why does “corn” mean “maize” in American English?
In which region is "corn" synonymous with "rye"?
Jan
3
comment 'Which' applied to brute animals
@Kris Which statement sounds like a blanket statement?
Jan
3
comment “Who” as applied to non-human animals
@MετάEd Two questions are listed as exact duplicates. Which one is the duplicate?
Jan
3
comment “Who” as applied to non-human animals
@MετάEd This question addresses one specific case of that question, which addresses a much broader issue. Is it still considered a duplicate?
Jan
3
comment “Who” as applied to non-human animals
I have also seen phrases like "the person that I saw yesterday" being used in colloquial and informal English, instead of "the person who I saw yesterday".
Jan
3
comment “Who” as applied to non-human animals
As a side-note, I think this grammatical issue might be contentious among some animal rights advocates. :)
Jan
3
asked “Who” as applied to non-human animals
Jan
3
comment Use of “it” and “its” for people and animals
@Unreason Referring to an animal as "it" could also be considered demeaning, although it is often used for animals of unknown gender. I wonder if there's a less demeaning pronoun to describe animals of unknown gender.