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I'm the author of a natural language programming tool called EngScript, which automatically translates English sentences into Python source code.

For reference, I've posted a link to questions with tags that I'm interested in.

Right now, I'm searching for a parser that can handle ambiguous grammars.

In theory, it would be possible to represent JavaScript code using Polish notation:

def sum , foo , bar baz {
    ; var theSum + foo + bar baz
    ; = return theSum
}

for var i 0 < i 10 ++ i {
    ; print sum 5 5
}

foreach current [ , 1 , 2 3 ] {
    ; print current
}

In theory, it would also be possible to create a very concise programming language with implicitly defined parameters:

isDivisibleBy: (foo % bar) == 0
//This is a function with 2 parameters: foo and bar.

isEven: isDivisibleBy(foo, 2)

isOdd: !isEven(param1)

firstCharacter: theString[0]

lastCharacter: theString[theString.length - 1]

firstNCharacters: theString[0:end]

firstCharacterIsLastCharacter: firstCharacter(stringParameter) == lastCharacter(stringParameter)

printEach: for current in anArray{ print current }

http://rosettacode.org/ is one of the most comprehensive programming language references I've ever found.

Optionally-typed programming languages are really awesome: they combine the type safety of languages like Java with the conciseness of languages like Python.

Some cool things that I've made:

Someday, I hope it will be possible to create a programming language that mixes code from different languages into a single file, like this:

Python {
    def foo():
        return "foo"
}
Ruby {
    def bar
        return foo + " was called from Python."
    end
}

Jul
15
comment Is there an EBNF that covers all of English
There is a machine-readable dialect of English called Attempto Controlled English: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attempto_Controlled_English
Jul
11
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
28
comment Opposite of “literal”
Here's a comprehensive list of antonyms of "literal": thesaurus.com/browse/literal
Feb
25
awarded  Famous Question
Feb
18
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
9
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
15
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
22
accepted How can I distinguish between the singular and plural of “species”?
Jul
22
asked How can I distinguish between the singular and plural of “species”?
Jan
3
comment Why does “corn” mean “maize” in American English?
In which region is "corn" synonymous with "rye"?
Jan
3
comment 'Which' applied to brute animals
@Kris Which statement sounds like a blanket statement?
Jan
3
comment “Who” as applied to non-human animals
@MετάEd Two questions are listed as exact duplicates. Which one is the duplicate?
Jan
3
comment “Who” as applied to non-human animals
@MετάEd This question addresses one specific case of that question, which addresses a much broader issue. Is it still considered a duplicate?
Jan
3
comment “Who” as applied to non-human animals
I have also seen phrases like "the person that I saw yesterday" being used in colloquial and informal English, instead of "the person who I saw yesterday".
Jan
3
comment “Who” as applied to non-human animals
As a side-note, I think this grammatical issue might be contentious among some animal rights advocates. :)
Jan
3
asked “Who” as applied to non-human animals
Jan
3
comment Use of “it” and “its” for people and animals
@Unreason Referring to an animal as "it" could also be considered demeaning, although it is often used for animals of unknown gender. I wonder if there's a less demeaning pronoun to describe animals of unknown gender.
Jan
3
comment What word describes the dislike of non-human (extraterrestrial) species?
"Xenophobic" is also often applied to the dislike of humans by other humans, so it could be somewhat ambiguous.
Nov
22
comment “We're all each other has”
I read it as "we are all [that] each other has" - i.e., "each other is all that we have", "we have nothing but each other."
Nov
21
revised Synonym for “do you mean” without negative connotations
edited body