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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 8 votes cast
Feb
8
comment “Dial M for Murder” meaning
Another common usage that was frequently seen in media from that time period is dialing numbers starting with "KLondike-5-____". This of course translates to "555-____", which is still used today whenever they want to put a fake phone number in a movie or TV show.
Feb
5
comment An adjective for the condition of a used brush
@shawnt00: For paintbrushes, I would've suggested "stiff", as they tend to get that way after use due to paint that sticks to the bristles becoming harder to clean out over time. Doesn't really work for a toothbrush though.
Feb
5
comment Up in Annie's room behind the wall paper
@Silenus: Unlikely, given that it dates to around WWI, and Anne Frank would not have even been born yet. Her experiences occurred during WWII, and her diary wasn't discovered and published until years after that.
Feb
5
comment Term for: Simultaneous rare experience/occurrence
Conversely, you might use perfect storm to refer to more unpleasant coincidences...
Feb
4
comment Synonym of 'kangaroo court'
I'd say that "impromptu court" implies one that was hastily arranged (possibly in the absence of any official legal procedure), but not necessarily one that is unfair. "Mock court" or more likely "mock trial" could be used in that sense, but also could be used as a practice as @Panzercrisis stated.
Feb
3
comment Synonymous idiom for “more x than you can shake a stick at”
@ToddWilcox: Not always the implied bodily orifices either. "The wazoo", "the woodwork", and "the tapestries" are common sources for things that come out in abundance. (Okay, the "wazoo" could be a bodily orifice, it's not clearly defined...)
Feb
2
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
This is the most literal match to the original phrase, basically just replacing the rat with a mouse, and adding a rhyme in the process. I've still never heard it in common usage before, but the meaning is pretty clear.
Jan
31
answered What's another word for “grind thoroughly” or “grind smoothly”?
Jan
31
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
@JoeBlow: Look, I don't know why you seem to have some personal vendetta against this answer. I've provided source to back it up, and several other people have expressed support for it, so obviously there are other people who use the term in this manner. Frankly, you're starting to come off as a little bit hostile and abusive here. Language usage is subjective and varies by region and culture. Not every word means the same thing to all people. I'd kindly suggest you just back away and let it go. Nothing matters that much.
Jan
31
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
The OP also did say "Any suggestions, even if they don't convey the entire meaning?" So this is at least partly related.
Jan
29
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
@Joe - I was quoting the linked Wikipedia article on that one. Apparently usage varies by region.
Jan
29
answered Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
Jan
27
comment Is there a term for a free ride without consent?
@Morgen: Nevertheless, some people have done it and survived, notably including the story all over the headlines a few years ago of a 5 year old boy who survived a wheel-well flight from L.A. to Hawaii. It's obviously a terrible idea, but not necessarily lethal...
Jan
25
comment Is there a term for a free ride without consent?
A more train-specific term would be hobo.
Jan
22
comment Term for doing something little by little?
I disagree with this one - something can happen intermittently without in any way advancing a long term goal. My car's windshield wipers, for example. They operate once every set interval, but they never get any closer to a "done" state.
Jan
21
comment Why is the indefinite article used in “as a last resort”?
If your first course of action succeeds, then technically it was your "last resort", since you didn't need any of the other ones...
Dec
30
answered What is the offline equivalent of clickbait?
Dec
29
comment Why there are two different meanings for “triweekly”?
I'd avoid any terms that divide a week, since there's no way to do it evenly - 7 is not a multiple of 2 or 3 (or anything else since it's prime). True, 365 is also not a multiple of 2 or 3 either, but you can get a lot closer to a half- or third-year than a half- or third-week.
Dec
22
comment Is possessive's apostrophe dispensable in any case?
@Echelon: Well of course, in most programming languages, the ' has a specific meaning, and cannot be used as part of a variable name. So the s at the end of a word should really only be used for pluralization. Thus I'd expect a variable named "columnsWidth" to describe the combined width of multiple columns. To the answer above, I'd add that the only exceptions to the apostrophe rule for possessives are specifically pronouns.
Dec
20
comment Less than/Fewer than 20 percent of the doctors replied
If a room contains fewer than one doctor, there are unequivocally zero doctors in the room. If it contains less than one doctor - it's possible there's still part of a doctor (who might be wishing there were a few more doctors around).