Reputation
1,005
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
1 5 11
Newest
 Editor
Impact
~21k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 11 votes cast
2d
comment Word to describe someone who goes to all the events in town!
This is the first thing I thought of, though it unfortunately is gender specific. I suppose you could use "Woman about town", but I've never heard that expression, much less anything gender-neutral. "Person about town"? Just doesn't have the same ring to it.
2d
comment What non-religious expressions can I use instead of “Thank God”?
@DevSolar - I know a few Wiccans who use this expression. I'm not sure how canonical their beliefs are (Wicca seems to be less of a single organized religion and more a loosely connected set of them). I've also heard people who identify as Christian but believe in a God who is female (or at least not necessarily male - could be both genders or neither). I am non-religious myself, so it's all second-hand. I'm sure there are other historical examples, though they would admittedly be in the extreme minority.
2d
comment What non-religious expressions can I use instead of “Thank God”?
@DevSolar - Well, monotheistic and English-speaking at least. While the word "God" may be technically masculine, I've very seldom heard the feminine equivalent "Goddess" used in the same manner (i.e., used as if it were a name), even by people who consider their single deity to be female. When it is used, it's almost always preceded by "the", e.g. "Thank the Goddess". In polytheistic societies, you'll most likely hear the plural "Thank the Gods" or they'll just pick their favorite of their gods to thank by name, e.g. "Thank Zeus".
2d
comment What was “Herbal Tea” called before ‘tea’ was introduced in Europe?
@Pharap - Oh, you've seen it all the time, it just gets bastardized into a 'y' most of the time. E.g. "Ye Olde Taverne" or whatnot (should be "Þe Olde Taverne", or as we would read it "The Olde Taverne"), because the old English script for a 'þ' looks a lot like a backwards 'y'.
Apr
27
comment What is a word for a condition one is born with?
This implies the trait is shared by one's parents/ancestors. A birth defect, for example, may not be hereditary, but it's still present from birth.
Apr
26
comment Is it conceivable that President Obama might use the word “queue”?
@T.E.D. - The problem I see with that statement is the word "borrow". I don't smoke, but my understanding is that cigarettes are pretty much single-use commodities. I don't think anyone is going to want it back when you're done with it...
Apr
20
comment Having done something so often, that it's all routine
This implies doing a sub-par job at something, more because you don't care than because you've done it so many times. You don't have to be experienced to phone it in. A lackluster performance can be given by a complete novice just as easily.
Apr
18
comment Derogatory word or idiom for city dwellers
@Mark - I think you're confusing "flat" with "low altitude". Look at Lombard Street and tell me the terrain doesn't have an affect on direction of travel. Florida is flat. San Francisco is lumpy, just at a low elevation.
Apr
18
comment Derogatory word or idiom for city dwellers
@jamesqf - It's not the total elevation so much as the sudden changes from one block to the next. SF is notorious for having some of the steepest hills you'll find in a major urban area, provided you get off the main streets a bit. (If you just want elevation, maybe try Denver). Either way, I'd say most mid western farm country is much flatter than some of our major cities...
Apr
18
comment Derogatory word or idiom for city dwellers
"Flatlanders" doesn't work if the city they're from is e.g. San Francisco...
Apr
10
comment Word for people who eat out in restaurants/eateries
I would think "diners" could also be used to refer to people eating dinner at home, though it does at least imply people being served, rather than just making their own food.
Apr
5
comment Word for when someone enforces a rule on some occasions but not others
Wouldn't call it "random" if it's only enforced when advantageous to the enforcer. That word implies that it could be good or bad for all involved with equal probability.
Apr
3
comment A strong antonym for “dictator”?
In the political sense, you could use statesman, meaning an honorable and generally well-liked politician (Yes, those used to be a thing that existed). Not sure that could be applied to a school principal, however, thus comment and not an answer.
Apr
1
answered Word or phrase for non-linear-but-still-greater-than-linear?
Mar
25
answered What is this method of joking about a morbid situation called?
Mar
13
comment English equivalent of Polish saying “You let a boor into office and he will drink ink”
On a side-note, the show Mythbusters actually tested the "bull in a china shop" adage a few years ago (by setting up some shelves full of pottery in a bull pen), and the result was that the bulls all just ran nimbly around the shelves and didn't damage a single thing, so that phrase is somewhat inaccurate anyhow. Don't know if they can be convinced to repeat the experiment with elephants...
Mar
13
comment English equivalent of Polish saying “You let a boor into office and he will drink ink”
I wanted to suggest something along the lines of "You'll put your eye out" from A Christmas Story, but given the example actually involves eye damage, that might be a little too on-the-nose. (Or slightly up and to one side as it were.) I might go with something more general like "This is why we can't have nice things!"
Mar
13
comment English equivalent of Polish saying “You let a boor into office and he will drink ink”
I'm not sure this conveys the same meaning. The Polish phrase implies that the person will do something stupid which only harms himself (drinking ink), while the bull (or elephant) in a china shop (or porcelain warehouse) implies there will be massive property damage...
Mar
11
comment Idiom request for describing someone who is writhing in great pain
You've apparently never watched a soccer game. They're notorious for overreactions to pain. (See the 2 pictures in the OP.) At any rate, my point is that writhing in pain is generally in reference to a kind of full-body pain, while doubling over is specific to the gut area.
Mar
10
comment Besides raisins, what other dried fruits and vegetables have their own names?
There's "banana chips", though that's two words, and includes the original un-dried fruit in the name. Still, I've never heard any other fruit called "chips" when dried. (There's "corn chips", but there's a lot more involved in those than simply drying corn.)