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seen Jan 5 at 20:13

Jan
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
25
comment Pronunciation of “lib”
@JonHanna Then I assumed incorrectly. Withdrawn.
Jan
25
comment Pronunciation of “lib”
@PeterShor That's an interesting point. If it's true, I wonder why that is. My guess is that it's the difference between a language that's mostly spoken (English) and a language that's mostly written (tech-speak).
Jan
24
comment Pronunciation of “lib”
Please excuse the fake IPA. I don't have the concentration right now to figure it out, but anyone's welcome to fix my mistakes.
Jan
24
answered Pronunciation of “lib”
Jan
17
revised Words based on the names of gods
added 48 characters in body
Jan
16
revised Words based on the names of gods
added more
Jan
16
comment An or a in given sentence scenario
yup, a/an is just phonological. There's no semantics.
Jan
8
comment What is the typography term which refers to the usage of bold, italics, and underline styles simultaneously?
I'd call it "too bad" or "too much". Possibly "unfortunate".
Jan
8
comment What is the typography term which refers to the usage of bold, italics, and underline styles simultaneously?
That simply describes the shape (and meaning) of the balloon, not the emphasis on the font. Note that it even says the balloons are not italicized.
Jan
3
comment Pronunciation of “Jan. 3”
@J.R. What's the debate about? I believe tchrist is saying that when used in a date, you pronounce it "third", never "three".
Jan
2
comment What did we gain in return for the loss of phonemic vowel length from Old English?
I think this should be migrated to Linguistics.SE since it's clearly not localized to English.
Dec
14
answered What's the noun for an animal's personality?
Dec
11
revised What exactly constitutes a verb in English, and is it the same thing as a predicate?
formatting and tags.
Dec
11
suggested suggested edit on What exactly constitutes a verb in English, and is it the same thing as a predicate?
Nov
28
comment When does “part” mean “quarter”?
I'm guessing your assumption comes from a few paragraphs up where Elkenbrand "was retreating hither with all that is left of the best Riders of Westfold". That is the other missing part. (ref: iment.com/maida/tv/lordoftherings/twotowersetext.htm)
Nov
28
answered “What a good news” vs. “such a good news”
Nov
28
comment A word that describes goofing off at work that can be used as an adjective in front of the word activity?
or "non-productive"
Nov
28
answered “Why do people read books?” — “Because people read books to get information.”
Nov
27
comment Origin of “More X than you can shake a stick at”
it's interesting that a lot of these are time-bound ("... in a month", etc.), whereas the modern expression leaves that off.