1,618 reputation
1722
bio website google.com
location Here
age 93
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Nov 23 at 4:41

Oct
18
comment What is the origin of the phrase “There goes the neighborhood” and does it have racial connotations?
Actually, the Federal Housing Administration explicitly used race as a metric of "neighborhood desirability" so the fear of depreciation that @choster mentions was quite real and enforced by federal policy until the Fair Housing Act. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Housing_Administration#Redlining
Oct
16
comment Did the CIA really introduce 'conspiracy theory' into popular usage after JFK?
Sounds like a joke.
Oct
15
comment Is the word European the only word that doesn't go after “an?”
What are you asking? "This" also doesn't go after "an". "Purple" also doesn't. Also, "are"...
Oct
15
comment OxFORD and CamBRIDGE
It's hard to tell what you're asking here. If your question is along the lines of your above comment, please put that in the question. If your question is about loconyms and manmade water crossings, ask that. Right now, it may seem obvious to you, but I have no idea exactly what you're asking, and evidenced by your unimpressed reaction to answers, neither do the other participants here.
Oct
15
comment Use of “of” to define objects?
There's no significant difference between "the penguins of Malaysia" and "the United States of America". There's no significant difference between "the Kingdom of Cambodia" and "the police station of Pawtucket".
Oct
15
awarded  Famous Question
Oct
14
comment What is the etymology of “[computer] terminal”?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_terminal
Oct
14
comment What is the verb for developing a chip on one's shoulder?
@FumbleFingers Does the supplemental question make this more answerable?
Oct
14
revised What is the verb for developing a chip on one's shoulder?
try to make this more answerable
Oct
11
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
11
comment What is the verb for developing a chip on one's shoulder?
@MrHen Picked up?
Oct
11
comment What is the verb for developing a chip on one's shoulder?
I'm specifically asking for a verb to use with that idiom that means "to become a person who has" a chip on their shoulder. Also, all of these words have very different connotations than the idiom - and the first two are transitive!
Oct
11
asked What is the verb for developing a chip on one's shoulder?
Sep
28
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
13
comment What part of speech is “only” in “Fame lights a fuse that leads only to extinguishment”?
Omitting the quotation marks in the title leads to a very compelling question!
Sep
9
comment How did the word “copacetic” come into use?
@hunter - First, why is 1919 an implausible time period? The British started military occupation in 1917. Second, this answer has nothing to do with Yiddish whatsoever.
Aug
28
awarded  Quorum
Aug
28
suggested suggested edit on Difference between “rip on someone” and “pick on someone”?
Aug
23
comment What does “sock puppeting” mean?
meta.stackoverflow.com/tags/sock-puppets/info
Aug
20
comment “Please leave the tomatoes at home” - meaning
This is much older than Vaudeville. I believe the custom was commom even in Shakespeare's time.