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Apr
28
answered What non-religious expressions can I use instead of “Thank God”?
Apr
17
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
22
comment “The place where we promised to meet”
To clarify: while it is grammatically correct, it is an unusual phrasing - most english speakers will say "the point we promised to meet at" rather than "the point at which we promised to meet", which removes the ambiguity.
Mar
22
comment “The place where we promised to meet”
You might consider, "the rendezvous point" - most english speakers will understand that to mean "the place we promised to meet at"
Mar
22
comment “The place where we promised to meet”
trysting place implies you are meeting there for ahem romantic reasons
Mar
1
comment What is the single word for “make something slow”?
I am from the UK and retard is an entirely unacceptable term, used exclusively as an offensive word for people with mental disabilities. I suspect Chenmunka is used to interacting only with a small subset of the population (academics maybe?), for I can assure you that among the "common" people, retard is very definitely an insult first and foremost.
Feb
29
comment How to describe the “oil flying out of the pan” when cooking?
How about: "painful"
Feb
25
comment Word meaning: A slip of the tongue which suggests how you actually feel, often humorous
Vaguely related: you may also be thinking of a spoonerism
Feb
18
accepted What is an “operator chair”?
Feb
17
comment What is an “operator chair”?
@BiscuitBoy In a shop selling furniture. If you google "operator chair", it seems to be a common category.
Feb
17
asked What is an “operator chair”?
Nov
22
awarded  Yearling
Nov
16
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
13
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
7
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
9
accepted What's the difference between evasion and avoidance?
Sep
8
asked What's the difference between evasion and avoidance?
Aug
6
comment What expression do you have in English as a counterpart to Japanese saying “Earthquake, Thunderbolt, Fire and Father"?
Point of interest: Because "Father" has lost it's power, this may have become an example of Arson, Murder, Jaywalking
Aug
5
awarded  Good Question
Jul
31
awarded  Notable Question