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visits member for 1 year, 10 months
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I’m also http://english.stackexchange.com/users/edit/22318

I’m a cognitive scientist, specializing in language, at Queen Mary University of London. I teach an Intro to Latex course each year from incoming graduate students. I’ve undertaken several substantial editorial jobs in latex and am always looking to improve my tex skills.


Mar
28
comment Word for feeding poultry?
Thanks, didn't think to do an ngram check. "scattering" it is, then.
Mar
28
accepted Word for feeding poultry?
Mar
28
asked Word for feeding poultry?
Mar
28
comment A noun adjunct / the possessive case
Thanks Joe: I don't move in the right circles to know about boaty jargon.
Mar
4
comment All of us, including “me” or “I”
No harm in covering all bases though, @Kris. It is more to the point than mention of myself: me was at least in the question.
Mar
4
revised Are there any terms equivalent to 'Americana' for other cultures?
added comments about personal names
Mar
3
answered Are there any terms equivalent to 'Americana' for other cultures?
Mar
3
comment All of us, including “me” or “I”
Can you supply some modern precedents for including I? I looked through google books and didn't find any. The phrase sounds hypercorrected to me and I think a native speaker's proper reaction on hearing it would be to guffaw. I agree with Kris’ answer that including must be followed by the accusative (which is the default form of the pronoun in contemporary English — Me is the answer to Who's coming?, ousting erstwhile I), irrespective of the case of the argument to which it is an adjunct.
Mar
3
comment All of us, including “me” or “I”
I would also be happy with me included.
Mar
1
comment Assuming answer to be true
True! That's now fixed
Mar
1
revised Assuming answer to be true
Added actual answer to the question!
Feb
27
comment Assuming answer to be true
I think you’re right that the last line wasn’t quite right. Surely it should be: “Hence g.f is an isomorphism”.
Feb
27
answered Assuming answer to be true
Feb
26
comment Would you ever accept the singular 'they/their' in formal writing – yes or no?
Not sure why you got the downvote: maybe because of the demand for a one word answer. (Mine is yes.) Maybe you should ask for examples of singular they in formal writing?
Feb
26
answered The Interrupting Colon – ie a colon after a verb
Feb
26
comment Predicative Position of Adjectives: Do We Hyphenate after the Verb?
@rhetorician: Your comment says everything I would put in an answer. If you posted it, I'd upvote it. (Well, maybe throw in a reference to a sensible style manual, like The Economist’s—and unless Edwin is implying that this is a duplicate question.)
Feb
23
comment What's the function of this “as”?
Perhaps you could expand a bit. A relative pronoun is simply an item with a particular grammatical function. So, it isn’t obvious what it means that as “works like a relative pronoun but not so in its grammatical function”. Or maybe you can articulate what’s “very special” about this usage of as?
Feb
20
comment Does the word “master” denote masculinity?
@ŁukaszL: can you give us some examples of newly feminized words?
Feb
16
revised Does “code of conduct” mean the same as “code of ethics”?
filled in missing word (mean, in title); word --> phrase; fixed smart quotes too
Feb
16
comment B is 4, A is 10 times more, is A 44?
Yes, we do, all of us. But their contexts of use differ. The longer one strikes us as more natural in a context where both are defined relative to a third number: If B = 2C and A = 20C, then A is ten times more than B. (This isn’t to rule out “A is ten times B” here. Rather, it is to illustrate a context where the longer version doesn’t sound somewhat natural.)