226 reputation
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location Unknow Galaxy
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visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Jul 19 '13 at 5:49

A student in Philosophy but also curious in many fields.


I don't know,

But I want to know.


Mar
13
comment Need we use “sums” in sentences whenever they describe the sum of plural objects?
According to standard English, in which cases should we use sums and in which cases just sum?
Mar
13
comment Need we use “sums” in sentences whenever they describe the sum of plural objects?
Also, three children makes a family correct in syntax?
Mar
13
comment Need we use “sums” in sentences whenever they describe the sum of plural objects?
@CarlSmith Well, what I mean is how to use sum correctly when its subject is 100 centimeters, which seems(s) both plural and singular.
Mar
13
comment Need we use “sums” in sentences whenever they describe the sum of plural objects?
@BillFranke Okay, but is 100 cm sums to 1 M correct?
Mar
13
comment Need we use “sums” in sentences whenever they describe the sum of plural objects?
1cm+99cm equals 100cm. 1cm+99cm equals 1m. So is 100cm equals 1m?
Mar
13
comment Need we use “sums” in sentences whenever they describe the sum of plural objects?
@Shyam Thank you. By the way, why there is a to?
Oct
7
comment Origin of “tout court”
@itsbruce Because I'm not quite familiar to French.
Oct
7
comment Origin of “tout court”
OK, I see. Thank you.
Oct
7
comment Origin of “tout court”
Okay, you're right, but why a French phrase appears in an English Dictionary?
Oct
7
comment Origin of “tout court”
@coleopterist I have found that tout means peep in Oxford Dictionary .
Oct
6
comment What's the difference between “hallow”, “sacred”, “holy” and “saint”?
Thanks, Oxford English Dictionary is quite useful.
Oct
5
comment What's the difference between “hallow”, “sacred”, “holy” and “saint”?
@coleopterist Okay, no problem.
Jun
16
comment What is the distinction between terms 'where', 'while', 'whereas' and 'whenever'?
OK, let me update it.
Jun
16
comment What is the distinction between terms 'where', 'while', 'whereas' and 'whenever'?
OK, no problem.