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location California
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visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Oct 8 at 0:09

I don't regard myself as particularly interested in English language and usage, but it is undeniable that I've often discussed them with friends.

I used to think my friends and I spent way too much time arguing details, but the experts on English StackExchange definitely have taken that to a new level (with plenty of newbie biting and antisocial behavior). So this is not a place I enjoy spending much time on, although I appreciate the good advice sprinkled throughout by the less ego-driven, well-meaning contributors.

Relevant info to know about me:

  • Native fluency in American English
  • Descriptivist

Aug
19
comment What is the correct form of address for a police officer?
If you're going to do that in the US, at least fake an English accent.
Aug
19
comment What is the correct form of address for a police officer?
@raxacoricofallapatorius You might not be doing anything wrong, and even if you were, you might not be aware of what it could be. But I doubt it's because you used "officer" to address a police officer.
Aug
18
comment What is a word in English that means “able to learn new things quickly”?
I think only in certain contexts would those words be acceptable for "able to learn new things quickly". For example, someone that was quickly able to learn how to garden or take care of the elderly wouldn't usually be called "clever" but a "fast learner".
Aug
18
comment “Comparing” vs “A comparison of ”
@RoaringFish The rest of the sentence is irrelevant. The sentence states a verbal noun is a noun. A noun formed in a certain way, certainly, but a noun nonetheless. Or do you believe that a sentence of the form "X is a Y formed from ..." means X is not a Y?
Aug
18
comment What exactly does the phrase “pass a week” mean?
Ambrose Bierce wrote at the end of the 19th century. It's not suprising he would use now-outdated language.
Aug
18
comment Difference between “commit suicide” and “suicide”
I suspect you are restricting to a certain class of people. I hear suicide much more than commit suicide and am skeptical about the danger of confusion. If it's common among high-schoolers, I'd say it's a natural construction and a lot of people do it (and the OP's query supports this).
Aug
18
awarded  Vox Populi
Aug
18
comment How do native English speakers respond to “Thank you”?
In that vein, "sure" or "sure thing".
Aug
18
comment How do native English speakers respond to “Thank you”?
I have a suspicion you are saying "thank you" too profusely (as compared to Americans). If you thank Americans in situations where they aren't necessarily expecting thanks, you will get an "uh-huh". Such situations include holding doors open.
Aug
18
comment How do native English speakers respond to “Thank you”?
+1 for mentioning "thank you" as a possible response to "thank you" and also mentioning that sometimes you don't need to respond directly.
Aug
18
comment How do native English speakers respond to “Thank you”?
@NeilFein I assume "See you next week" would be said with a smile in the example dialogue above.
Aug
18
awarded  Commentator
Aug
18
answered Is it “the position of particles” or “the positions of particles”?
Aug
18
comment Do I need a comma after “when in (%time)”?
The phrase "in 1914" is short enough that it doesn't need commas.
Aug
18
awarded  Suffrage
Aug
18
awarded  Excavator
Aug
18
revised What is the commonly accepted pronunciation of FAQ?
list what Wikipedia's sources are, since it's not even clear in the Wikipedia article
Aug
18
revised How popular is the word ‘Lede’? Why should it be ‘Political Ledes,’ not ‘Political Catches / Leads ’?
fix grammar in title
Aug
18
suggested suggested edit on How popular is the word ‘Lede’? Why should it be ‘Political Ledes,’ not ‘Political Catches / Leads ’?
Aug
18
suggested suggested edit on What is the commonly accepted pronunciation of FAQ?