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Sep
13
comment What do you call an event that happens without a cause?
I wouldn't take that person at physics stackexchange too seriously. They're using a very narrow definition of "random" that's definitely not agreed to by a majority of physicists or mathematicians.
Sep
12
comment What is a negative word to describe people that love showing off their knowledge?
A good answer, but one risks being seen as a "Claven" oneself by using the term.
Sep
12
comment A positive way to describe a know it all
If someone only corrected when it was helpful, that would be an entirely different type than the OP described. The type of person s/he described would correct someone, even when everybody else there considers the correction unhelpful (except the corrector of course). I think the issue is that a lot of people think they're being helpful, but they are sometimes not being so, and perhaps over time, even considered often unhelpful. I don't think this says anything bad about our society; more like it says something about those people who consider themselves such paragons of truth.
Sep
12
comment A positive way to describe a know it all
Such a person doesn't exist. Even a person "invariably right" is sometimes wrong for arguing a point in certain circumstances. That's why there are so many derogatory terms for related types of the kind you describe.
Sep
11
comment How to call certain kinds of tall shoes that women use to wear?
Interestingly, when I search for "stripper shoes" on Amazon, you get a bunch of stripper shoes, most of which do not say "stripper shoe" in their product title (Amazon probably uses terms from reviews and also click-throughs from searches). Amazon is smart about this, huh? They want to sell stripper shoes but not use the term... which I think ends up validating RyeBread's point.
Sep
11
comment Is there a word or a concise expression to describe 'a person who pretends not to want an object they truly desire'?
I'd say a "phoney/fake" is more about a person that pretends to be something they're not. It's not really about feigning indifference, although some phoneys do pretend to be "cool" by acting unaffected.
Sep
11
comment Why are words ending in “-um” and “-us” pluralized to end in “-a” and “-i”, respectively?
@JanusBahsJacquet Well, I wasn't arguing for that per se. I was arguing for ambivalence.
Sep
11
comment How to describe someone who speaks a language “as if it is his mother tongue” in a CV?
I kind of buy this. But I wonder, is there really a difference between saying "native proficiency" and "native fluency"? The latter sounds more natural to my ear.
Sep
11
answered How to describe someone who speaks a language “as if it is his mother tongue” in a CV?
Sep
11
comment How to describe someone who speaks a language “as if it is his mother tongue” in a CV?
@Jonas, with bilingual children, it is actually not uncommon that they can speak their non-native language better and indistinguishably from that of a native speaker.
Sep
9
comment Why are words ending in “-um” and “-us” pluralized to end in “-a” and “-i”, respectively?
@JanusBahsJacquet "...just making up strange ones"? I didn't make it up though, as I think you are well aware.
Jan
9
comment Is it “Check and mate” or “Checkmate”?
@Mitch It hasn't always been. The reason for the English term "stalemate" is precisely because a stalemate was considered one way to win for a period in chess history (see my comment to Pitarou's answer for a link).
Jan
9
comment Is it “Check and mate” or “Checkmate”?
I don't believe the distinction given exists. I've played in clubs and tournaments and generally it's considered rude to announce "check", "check and mate", "checkmate", or anything really, except to offer a draw. This etiquette extends to friendly games too, at least between players that take the game seriously.
Jan
9
comment Is it “Check and mate” or “Checkmate”?
For some time (at least in Britain), a stalemate was considered a win, hence a "mate". So by that convention, you can indeed be mated without being checked. books.google.com/…
Dec
6
comment What is a more modern variant of the interjection 'Lo!"
@jwpat7 Probably the best is to combine those two: "He claims he is innocent of corruption, but... Whoa, dude! He is taking bribes." :) (I'm reminded of Bill and Ted...)
Dec
6
comment What is a more modern variant of the interjection 'Lo!"
@Marcus_33 I would not use "dude" in a very formal context, which is what the OP wants.
Sep
3
revised Did President Obama break punctuation rules in his tweet?
president should be capitalized
Sep
3
comment Did President Obama break punctuation rules in his tweet?
In "President Obama", note 'president' is capitalized. This is also true for the phrase, "President of the USA". FYI.
Sep
3
suggested approved edit on Did President Obama break punctuation rules in his tweet?
Sep
3
comment Did President Obama break punctuation rules in his tweet?
This seat's color's red -- Yes, you're supposed to understand the two different uses of apostrophe in this example from context.