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Newest
 Explainer
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~3k people reached

May
8
revised Word for people who run, but not standard marathon distances
added 149 characters in body
May
8
answered Word for people who run, but not standard marathon distances
May
3
comment What is a “hot meal”?
@Oldbag everyone here understands your points. What we disagree with is that there is such a precise mental image formed as you assert. (Not a vegetarian, incidentally. )
Apr
26
comment What is a “hot meal”?
A fine answer otherwise, but I don't think the connotations of "hot meal" are so precise it excludes vegetarian meals.
Dec
23
comment Opposite of “trendy” without a negative meaning
I'd say "trend" is more neutral than "trendy". Even analysis is opinion. No need to disparage.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
3
comment What is a single word to describe beating someone brutally?
@KinjalDixit your link uses "brutalize" to mean a beating, which shocked and motivated the witness to leave the woman to be raped later. So that use of "brutalize" does not include rape. As Fixee pointed out, US print media does not use "brutalize" as a euphemism for rape, despite the above claim.
Jan
30
comment How to describe someone who speaks a language “as if it is his mother tongue” in a CV?
Tim, I have no idea what you are saying. There are plenty of people that did not speak English as a first language, came to the US at an early age, learned it as part of their environment (school, friends, but not their parents or home), and now speak English indistinguishably from a native, despite what you claim.
Jan
3
comment Difference between “game” and “sport”
In the US at least, most people wouldn't consider chess a sport. I'm aware that internationally it's quite different but I'd say examples like chess are the exception, not the rule. Scrabble, spelling, mathematical problem solving, can all be done at a high competitive level but most people don't consider them sports.
Dec
14
comment Origin of the phrases “third time’s the charm” and “third time lucky”?
I'd say something coming in threes is of a distinctively different thread of meaning than something happening on a third attempt, albeit related.
Dec
4
awarded  Yearling
Dec
4
answered What does ‘The vast majority (some 63%) of employees in the world are not engaged, “checked out”’ mean?
Dec
4
answered What do you call a person who keeps on going despite setbacks? (in one word, a noun)
Nov
26
answered Alternative term to 'Uncle Tom' for a black or colored person who is subservient to whites?
Oct
19
comment How to describe someone who speaks a language “as if it is his mother tongue” in a CV?
Supposed "foreigners" who grew up speaking English indistinguishably from the so-called native speaker can be reasonably considered to have "native fluency", which is my point.
Sep
18
comment What is the origin of the phrase “bush league”?
@mplungjan It was better to put it as an answer, not a comment.
Sep
18
comment What does the initial fragment of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy mean?
Good example of the busy father....
Sep
13
comment Secular alternative to “preaching to the choir”?
@JamesWebster To me, "lecturing the experts" suggests that you're trying to teach people that know better than you, e.g. "Why are you lecturing the experts here? Do you think you know better?"
Sep
13
comment Secular alternative to “preaching to the choir”?
Kristina, you say they have the same meaning, but then you give two different contexts and in each context only one is appropriate but not the other. So how can they convey the same meaning?