801 reputation
618
bio website wendikidd.unrealcreations.com
location Dallas, TX
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Jul 4 at 3:21

Programmer by profession and passion~


Jul
4
comment “Maths” for “Mathematics”; where does the S come from?
Well we both agree to Mathematics. It's just the shortened version that perplexes me.
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
12
comment
I appreciate the contributions you've made to ELL, and would love to have another ELU mod who is active in both communities. I think that would serve both sites very well, and you have my support! :)
Jun
11
awarded  Yearling
Jun
10
awarded  Caucus
May
30
awarded  Good Question
May
26
comment Term for an enchanted place
@snailplane That's an excellent point, and you're right that the meta discussion seems overwhelmingly in support of it. Based on the meta discussion and your and Fumble's support of the migration, I'm going to go ahead and migrate.
May
22
comment What is a word called that consists of a repetition of one word?
@MichaelLai Tartare is chopped up meat, but tartar is like tartar sauce.
May
18
awarded  Popular Question
May
17
awarded  Nice Question
May
17
comment Term for an enchanted place
@FumbleFingers Well, if the question isn't really answerable I'm not 100% sure it is on topic... In general I think I'm okay with single word requests, but if that's not something the community wants to support then I'd be happy to change my views. So I guess what I was trying to say was "I think this type of question is okay, but that this particular one might not be the best fit." Maybe this is something we should create a specific policy for on meta.
May
17
comment Term for an enchanted place
I feel like single word requests are on topic, but I'm not sure there's actually going to be a satisfactory answer for this one. I think the best answer is to give it a name and just describe it (ex "The Lost Hiddenlands" can be the proper name, and then just write a few paragraphs description). Because I don't think there's a single English word that gets this across. So the only answer I know to give isn't really an ELL answer. Hmm. Cc @fumble
May
17
comment “Maths” for “Mathematics”; where does the S come from?
@Mari-LouA Econ is, in the US at least, a very common abbreviation for economics classes. "Econ305" could be a class name, and "econ" is a popular way to refer to the class among students. "I'm making a B- in econ!" etc. I agree with you that I'm not sure I've heard it used to refer to real life economics; ex "A career econ is much less popular these days." So people might not use it to describe the economics outside of a school environment, but I think the example still stands in the context of my question.
May
17
revised “Maths” for “Mathematics”; where does the S come from?
added 239 characters in body
May
17
comment “Maths” for “Mathematics”; where does the S come from?
@user61979 See, that's a perfect example of what I'm talking about! Let's go with "economics", which can be "a study of the field of economy" as you said; either singular or plural. In AmE, we shorten this to "econ". I don't think BrE uses "econs" though, right? So why just "maths"?
May
17
comment “Maths” for “Mathematics”; where does the S come from?
@medica This is not a duplicate. I know that both are correct in each form of English; I'm asking why and what the history behind the distinction is.
May
17
asked “Maths” for “Mathematics”; where does the S come from?
May
8
comment A way of describing the lesbian parent that is not pregnant?
I'm not sure that "parent-to-be" solves the problem. A person of any gender, pregnant or not pregnant, could call themselves a "parent-to-be" if they're going to have a child in the near future in any way. You could still call yourself a "parent-to-be" even if you were pregnant, so I'm not sure if gets the message across.
May
8
comment “School Students” — what, like there's any other kind of student?
@JoeBlow Your opinion is your own, but across the network I dislike single-sentence yes/no answers. There were a lot of good answers to this question, but I thought I had something else to add (and the OP had left comments on other answers saying they did not fully answer her question), so I attempted to write my own.
May
8
comment “School Students” — what, like there's any other kind of student?
@Mari-LouA An excellent thought! I hadn't considered that. Though in that case, I think it'd make more sense to label the car with the school or school district's name/logo, because you're not trying to read the sign at fast speeds on the road. But yes, that's a logical conclusion to come to. I wonder if there's a number somewhere on one of these cars, and we could call and ask them? :)