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seen Apr 4 at 12:43

Sep
7
answered Is this grammatically correct? “We were thinking of holding a meeting…”
Sep
7
comment What's the adjective for “by distance”?
+1 totally agree with the qualification that directions are both temporal and spatial in nature. English by large abstracts these two aspects all the time, e.g., after the light turn right. Although after has a spatial definition, that is not the meaning here; substituting behind the light... does not make sense because the implied meaning of after in this context is temporal.
Sep
7
comment What's the adjective for “by distance”?
My only qualm with briefly is the implied relative duration, or shortness of the change. As I noted in a comment to the OP, in most cases, semantic abstraction of time and location is appropriate. Before, after, breifly, etc. have explicitly defined meanings for both contexts; however, a native English speaker will likely correctly interpret temporarily in this context as well.
Sep
7
comment What's the adjective for “by distance”?
Using time-related adverbs to describe location-based events is appropriate in the context of traveling "through a road", i.e., the name change does occur temporarily as long as the traveler is continuing to his or her destination. This form of semantic abstraction is also seen in words "before" and "after" which in modern English have both time and location meanings. (Interestingly, both before and after are derived from locality roots)
Jul
12
comment Are there any words in English that have a plural with a separate derivation?
@DavidSchwartz, I suppose you are right. Although person / people is historically analogous to pig / swine (cow / cattle is a different matter altogether), in modern usage it's meaning has changed. For consistent connotation, we have to say "3 people, 2 people, 1 person," because "1 people" means something different. The word "person" does not have this form of semantic switching - "3 persons, 2 persons, 1 person" is perfectly valid - but by convention, modern English speakers do not use it.
Jul
12
comment Are there any words in English that have a plural with a separate derivation?
Big +1 for going on the "Evidence of absence" argument. I believe you are correct, mainly in part because English nouns are particularly mutable, i.e., nouns that should have been or were traditionally irregular tend to morph into regular forms.
Jul
12
awarded  Supporter
Jul
12
comment Are there any words in English that have a plural with a separate derivation?
As @Malvolio points out that person-people is often quoted as a suppletive noun, it is not strictly so. Both are distinct nouns with distinct plurals - people just happens to be a collective or group noun. This is analogous to pig / swine and cow / cattle.
Jun
8
awarded  Teacher
Jun
8
answered What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?