702 reputation
1513
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen yesterday

Jun
13
comment Flip-flop with a single strap over the front of the foot
@phenry I see, changed my answer.
Jun
11
comment Can I use the word “precipice” to mean “cutting edge”?
"Bleeding Edge" has an additional connotation of being risky, unstable, or potentially more costly to implement than is justified that isn't inherent to the others, I would say.
Jun
5
comment Is ‘hero’ applicable to females?
Antiheroine does appear to be a word but I agree that it would sound very out of place over using antihero for both genders
May
4
comment Why is an actor sometimes called 'ham'?
Check, for example, Kanye West song H.A.M. or the urban dictionary entry for the origin of the slang
May
3
comment Why is an actor sometimes called 'ham'?
That phrase is an abbreviation of hard as a m*****f***** and not related to the acting term.
Aug
31
comment Word meaning something is technically accurate but overly simplistic
Haven't actually heard it used like that before. Similar but doesn't imply that the author is doing it intentionally, which is what I was going for
Aug
31
comment Word meaning something is technically accurate but overly simplistic
Thats it, thanks.
Aug
7
comment A word meaning “more related”
You could just say "Or is her condition psychosomatic?" since that is the word that means a condition that doesn't have a physical cause
Jul
1
comment Is the word “author” correct for the artist who created particular painting?
@DarekWędrychowski Author is definitely a valid synonym for writer in the cases you cite, as it can mean the occupation of writing, not just being the creator of a work. That being said, your second example should read "My uncle is the author of Catch 22" (If a work has multiple authors you would explicitly say "My uncle is one of the authors/a co-author of Catch 22."
Jul
19
comment How to pronounce “favicon”?
I always have called it fav-ih-con with analogy to rubicon or necronomicon. Both of those are derived from icon, I think, but drop the eye sound
Jul
4
comment Why was the ruler of the British Empire not an Emperor/Empress?
but never styles her/his self that way... I suppose that makes sense. It is strange that the British will refer to themselves as the British Empire but not call their monarch an empress officially, but I guess thats just historical.
Jun
16
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
Only as a negative unwittingly, which is certainly odd. As in, "He was my unwitting pawn", followed by "No, he was acting quite wittingly." I haven't really seen it used without an unwitting close at hand.
Jun
16
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
It is interesting that "unwitting" is still in use, but not "witting".
Jun
16
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
@Matt I know that. I was pointing out that if to spite was conjugated in the same way it would be spit or spote.
Jun
15
comment What is the proper term for names typically assigned to people in countries using the first-middle-last format?
That only is with respect to order, not with respect to 2-part and 3-part. It doesn't clarify if someone has a middle name.
Jun
15
comment Objects with no name, like “the Sun”
@FumbleFingers Earth's moon is most often called Luna in sci-fi.
Jun
15
comment What is the proper term for names typically assigned to people in countries using the first-middle-last format?
You can say "they have a middle name" or "they don't have a middle name". Leaving this as a comment, since there could be a good term.
Jun
15
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
hm. Wiktionary claims spited is a word. I don't know if I buy that. I can't smited or bited...
Jun
15
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
It can be used as a noun of course, but I checked dictionaries. No past tense. I can't imaging that I would spit (to bite), spote (to smite), or spited (to slight) someone. I checked: oxforddictionaries.com/definition/spite and another.
Jun
13
comment How is “æ” supposed to be pronounced?
@tchrist You convinced me. I wasn't buying the answer because I felt that the edge case still wasn't explained; why does Brittanica use the archaic ae but pronounce it as ee. The business logic that they must use the same name to keep the trademark explains the contradiction. Thanks.