692 reputation
1513
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 9 hours ago

Jun
16
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
It is interesting that "unwitting" is still in use, but not "witting".
Jun
16
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
@Matt I know that. I was pointing out that if to spite was conjugated in the same way it would be spit or spote.
Jun
16
revised What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
added 13 characters in body
Jun
16
accepted What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
Jun
15
comment What is the proper term for names typically assigned to people in countries using the first-middle-last format?
That only is with respect to order, not with respect to 2-part and 3-part. It doesn't clarify if someone has a middle name.
Jun
15
comment Objects with no name, like “the Sun”
@FumbleFingers Earth's moon is most often called Luna in sci-fi.
Jun
15
comment What is the proper term for names typically assigned to people in countries using the first-middle-last format?
You can say "they have a middle name" or "they don't have a middle name". Leaving this as a comment, since there could be a good term.
Jun
15
revised What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
added 149 characters in body
Jun
15
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
hm. Wiktionary claims spited is a word. I don't know if I buy that. I can't smited or bited...
Jun
15
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
It can be used as a noun of course, but I checked dictionaries. No past tense. I can't imaging that I would spit (to bite), spote (to smite), or spited (to slight) someone. I checked: oxforddictionaries.com/definition/spite and another.
Jun
14
revised What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
added 28 characters in body
Jun
14
asked What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
Jun
14
answered Can itself be used for a group of people?
Jun
14
awarded  Commentator
Jun
13
comment How is “æ” supposed to be pronounced?
@tchrist You convinced me. I wasn't buying the answer because I felt that the edge case still wasn't explained; why does Brittanica use the archaic ae but pronounce it as ee. The business logic that they must use the same name to keep the trademark explains the contradiction. Thanks.
Jun
13
awarded  Scholar
Jun
13
accepted How is “æ” supposed to be pronounced?
Jun
13
comment How is “æ” supposed to be pronounced?
When æ appears in writing Modern English, [it] is pronounced the same as that sequence of vowel letters would be. Encyclopædia, encyclopedia, and encyclopaedia are all pronounced the same. I feel like those statements conflict. I wouldn't pronounce ae and e the same way. Is there something I am missing?
Jun
13
revised How is “æ” supposed to be pronounced?
deleted 23 characters in body
Jun
13
awarded  Student