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seen Sep 20 at 20:53

Aug
27
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Aug
7
comment A word meaning “more related”
You could just say "Or is her condition psychosomatic?" since that is the word that means a condition that doesn't have a physical cause
Aug
2
answered Is there a single word for a person who overreacts?
Jul
15
answered Phrase meaning “To have passed or currently be at”
Jul
12
answered Term for a coup of the government led by corporations?
Jul
1
comment Is the word “author” correct for the artist who created particular painting?
@DarekWędrychowski Author is definitely a valid synonym for writer in the cases you cite, as it can mean the occupation of writing, not just being the creator of a work. That being said, your second example should read "My uncle is the author of Catch 22" (If a work has multiple authors you would explicitly say "My uncle is one of the authors/a co-author of Catch 22."
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8
awarded  Famous Question
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7
awarded  Yearling
Mar
9
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
19
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
11
awarded  Popular Question
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4
awarded  Constituent
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23
awarded  Caucus
Jul
19
comment How to pronounce “favicon”?
I always have called it fav-ih-con with analogy to rubicon or necronomicon. Both of those are derived from icon, I think, but drop the eye sound
Jul
4
accepted Why was the ruler of the British Empire not an Emperor/Empress?
Jul
4
comment Why was the ruler of the British Empire not an Emperor/Empress?
but never styles her/his self that way... I suppose that makes sense. It is strange that the British will refer to themselves as the British Empire but not call their monarch an empress officially, but I guess thats just historical.
Jul
4
asked Why was the ruler of the British Empire not an Emperor/Empress?
Jun
28
answered What is the right sign to show in a retail shop
Jun
19
answered Can I separate events with period to form past perfect?
Jun
16
comment What causes a verb to be infinitive only?
Only as a negative unwittingly, which is certainly odd. As in, "He was my unwitting pawn", followed by "No, he was acting quite wittingly." I haven't really seen it used without an unwitting close at hand.