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location Ireland
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visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Feb 28 at 10:51

Feb
28
awarded  Critic
Jun
21
comment Is there a name for how the Irish use so, so?
Actually, in French, depending on the region (of France or anywhere else), it's also quite common tu use the equivalents of 'so' donc, 'then' alors, or 'eh' hein in the same way, ie. at the end of the sentences, making them mid-finished but still mid-opened for a continuation ... I wouldn't say it's politeness marker, in any case, and I think the phenomenon is very specific to spoken, even colloquial language, so maybe NGrams won't help a lot here
Jun
12
comment Is it proper grammar to omit an ending quote at the end of a paragraph?
@J.R. Yes, true, it's definitely a blurry line. Note that I don't consider punctuation to be excluded from grammar :o) just in my sense, it's mostly ruled both by grammar and typo (most often by grammar, for sure, and probably that some would consider typo being within the grammar scope, but I don't). And this precise case is a good example on controversial case, probably.
Jun
12
comment Is it proper grammar to omit an ending quote at the end of a paragraph?
@J.R. indeed, punctuation is not grammar ... 'Punctuation' is a set of signs, just like 'alphabet' is. Thus, like alphabet is ruled by lexicon, syntax, morphology and typography, punctuation is ruled by lexicon (sometimes in some languages), syntax, morphology and typography. Here, the rule is a graphical arrangement, a visual sugar, and has strictly no incidence on the grammaticality. Then it's typography, and not grammar, definitely.
Jun
12
revised “He'd so much as touched” meaning
minor corrections
Jun
12
suggested suggested edit on “He'd so much as touched” meaning
Jun
10
revised Difference between “robot”, “machine”, and “automaton”
added 54 characters in body
Jun
10
answered Difference between “robot”, “machine”, and “automaton”
Jun
8
suggested suggested edit on Is it proper grammar to omit an ending quote at the end of a paragraph?
Jun
8
comment Is it proper grammar to omit an ending quote at the end of a paragraph?
I think it is not 'proper grammar', since it is typography, not exactly grammar then :o)
Jun
7
comment “Nobody does something for nothing”
Indeed ... Corpora don't lie ... But in my sense those results represent the usage of the terms themselves in litterature during centuries, and in our case, that doesn't mean a lot ... Except maybe that if it's a twentieth century expression, it's more likely a "proverb", statistically ;-) Ow anyway, don't fight ... I think you're right, "proverb" is probably not the better choice for this expression.
Jun
7
revised considers a probability vector v containing the probabilities of jumping to each vertex
added 46 characters in body
Jun
6
revised considers a probability vector v containing the probabilities of jumping to each vertex
added 225 characters in body
Jun
6
awarded  Editor
Jun
6
revised considers a probability vector v containing the probabilities of jumping to each vertex
jump between vertices seems to be acceptable
Jun
6
answered considers a probability vector v containing the probabilities of jumping to each vertex
Jun
6
comment “Nobody does something for nothing”
Hmm ok ... I am not sure there is a general consensus about that, as well as in my mind, "adage", "maxim" and "proverb" overlap considerably, and are not necessarily very old-honoured ("adage" might even be the oldest). A "saying" is maybe more general, so let's say it's a saying ? nb: I used "proverb" not to be confusing, because that's how TFD, the source I am pointing, is classifying it.
Jun
6
awarded  Supporter
Jun
6
awarded  Teacher
Jun
6
answered “Nobody does something for nothing”