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 Yearling
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Feb
13
answered Is calling someone “old school”- offensive/derogatory?
Jan
16
comment Is there a formal word for people that are local to a place?
'First Nations' seems to be a term used by people who are embarrassed to say aborigine.
Jan
13
comment Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
I don't think this implies that the action was sitting. It's about failing to choose which of your options to commit to, and thereby failing at both.
Jan
13
comment Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
If you actually come to a standstill, it's called a deadlock.
Jan
1
answered Idiom that means trying to save something that is beyond saving
Jan
1
comment Idiom that means trying to save something that is beyond saving
Ok. The definition you reference uses the phrase "potential advantages". I don't see how that contradicts what I said.
Jan
1
comment Idiom that means trying to save something that is beyond saving
Surely the sense is that the potential winnings from the game wouldn't cover the cost of the candle.
Nov
29
answered What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?
Nov
23
comment Is there such a variety as "Standard Black English”, spoken by educated African Americans, or is it just a racist phrase?
Interesting jargon use of 'register'. What does that mean in plain English, and how does it connect with plain English uses of register?
Nov
23
comment Is “denigrate” a racist word?
I was once told, in all seriousness, by a well-meaning but very wrong person, that it was racist to use the term blackboard. Some people accept this kind of PC nonsense without attempting to apply rational thought. Don't worry - if you are not a racist, it's pretty difficult to give offence, except to people who are self-indulgently hair-trigger about it all.
Oct
13
comment Can “the rubber meets the road” be used as a stand-alone phrase to mean “stop disaster in its tracks or keep it at bay”?
Presumably in the case of athletes, we're talking about the rubber soles of their race shoes rather than car tyres.
Jun
27
comment What do you call the sheet that a barber covers you with?
A sheet. Why do you need a special word?
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
May
10
comment Best word for “Dr. Einstein, <blank> of the theory of Special Relativity.”
@medica - he did create Einstein's theories of relativity. Maybe he stood on the shoulders of giants (or was that Newton? :-) but we credit him with creating his own theory. In the context of science, that robs no-one.
May
6
comment Best word for “Dr. Einstein, <blank> of the theory of Special Relativity.”
The theory of relativity is a way of describing and understanding certain physically observable phenomena. It is not the phenomena it describes, which are fundamental aspects of the universe we live in. So Einstein did create the theory, although, of course, he did not create what it describes.
Mar
23
awarded  Student
Mar
23
revised Is libre the only English single-word adjective signifying 'liberty' without also meaning 'at no monetary cost'?
added 175 characters in body
Mar
23
asked Is libre the only English single-word adjective signifying 'liberty' without also meaning 'at no monetary cost'?
Dec
5
comment Why is “a couple of <things>” often shortened to “a couple <things>”?
I tried hearing it as coupla for the first 20 or 30 times, but you can't get round it: people are saying 'couple' where 'coupla' might make more sense.
Oct
30
comment What word describes a policeman who is not wearing a uniform?
It's also useful to distinguish between "a plainclothes officer" and "an officer in plainclothes". The latter can be someone who generally works for the uniform branch, but is assigned to some detective work, or whatever.