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Apr
26
comment keeping maiden name after marriage
So - I just got a downvote without the courtesy of a comment. Nice.
Apr
19
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
I'd have said "Delhi belly". I wouldn't worry about these informal terms being racist. The sense of it is that you have eaten food which would presumably not trouble the locals. As a foreigner you don't have the tolerance they have built up to their local diet. Changes in diet are a well known cause of this kind of problem - why not use that fact to add a bit of humour. I don't think there's any connotation that one group of people is better than another.
Dec
29
answered Why there are two different meanings for “triweekly”?
Sep
30
comment “The Kind of Morning Where/When You…” Which Is Correct?
Nicely put. ......
Sep
27
comment “The Kind of Morning Where/When You…” Which Is Correct?
Yes. When is better than where. The problem is that the question is phrased as 'which is correct'.
Sep
25
revised Is “used in anger” a Britishism for something?
added 213 characters in body
Aug
23
comment What do you call someone who has been in custody as a prisoner of war?
This is the correct answer because we have no special word for it. And "former" is better than "liberated", because not all former PoWs were liberated.
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
May
2
comment Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?
You probably guessed, my last comment got mangled by my telephone. I meant "rakishness".
May
1
comment Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?
Pretty much the whole genre. If a young woman says she fears her suitor is a rake, we all know what she's suggesting. There are also examples of female rakish Ness.
May
1
comment Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?
Maybe this comes from excessive exposure to folk song, but the immediate association in mind from 'rake' or 'rakeishness' is of sexual promiscuity. Whereas a playboy is only incidentally so.
Feb
13
answered Is calling someone “old school”- offensive/derogatory?
Jan
16
comment Is there a formal word for people that are local to a place?
'First Nations' seems to be a term used by people who are embarrassed to say aborigine.
Jan
13
comment Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
I don't think this implies that the action was sitting. It's about failing to choose which of your options to commit to, and thereby failing at both.
Jan
13
comment Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
If you actually come to a standstill, it's called a deadlock.
Jan
1
answered Idiom that means trying to save something that is beyond saving
Jan
1
comment Idiom that means trying to save something that is beyond saving
Ok. The definition you reference uses the phrase "potential advantages". I don't see how that contradicts what I said.
Jan
1
comment Idiom that means trying to save something that is beyond saving
Surely the sense is that the potential winnings from the game wouldn't cover the cost of the candle.
Nov
29
answered What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?
Nov
23
comment Is there such a variety as "Standard Black English”, spoken by educated African Americans, or is it just a racist phrase?
Interesting jargon use of 'register'. What does that mean in plain English, and how does it connect with plain English uses of register?