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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 24 votes cast
Nov
20
comment English letter sequence with most pronunciations
I guess English is far from being the hardest language in the world. Nevertheless, whoever came up with the idea of consistent phonetic spelling throughout a language deserves a medal!
Nov
20
comment “In orbit” vs. “on orbit”
Ooh, I didn't know that at all. Very informative, and it's great to learn something new. Upvoted accordingly! (I am starting to think that the combination of experiments and orbits is a linguistic MINEFIELD, though.)
Nov
20
answered “In orbit” vs. “on orbit”
Nov
20
answered How to read aloud a sentence like 'In the year 18.. they decided to move to Bricktown'
Nov
20
answered Why are words such as “that” and “those” not considered articles?
Nov
19
awarded  Critic
Nov
19
comment “I'm well” vs. “I'm good” vs. “I'm doing well”, etc
I think this question is actively pernicious. By implying that there's something wrong with <i>the way real people actually use the "how are you" standard greeting-and-response</i> in the title, you run a serious risk of hopelessly confusing students of the language who don't know any better. There is nothing wrong with "I'm well" as a response to "How are you". Whether it is stylized or idiomatic, that's another question.
Nov
19
comment English letter sequence with most pronunciations
My "though" rhymes with "go", but my "thorough" rhymes with "kookaburra" :D
Nov
19
answered Origin and meaning of “The eagle flies at midnight”
Nov
19
answered Is “my bad” a correct English phrase?
Nov
19
answered What is the opposite of “interesting” in “This person is interesting”?
Nov
19
comment What is the opposite of “interesting” in “This person is interesting”?
+1 because "tiresome" was my thought too!
Nov
19
awarded  Commentator
Nov
19
comment Origin of “Turns the Table” idiom
I found this online, which clarifies even further: Games like backgammon are known as 'tables' games. The phrase 'turn the tables' derives from these games and from the practise of reversing the board so that players play from their opponent's previous position. The first known example of the figurative use of the phrase in print is in Robert Sanderson's XII sermons, 1634: "Whosoever thou art that dost another wrong, do but turn the tables: imagine thy neighbour were now playing thy game, and thou his."
Nov
19
answered “Which we discussed” vs. “about which we discussed”
Nov
19
answered Cross Origins of Comrade and Camaraderie
Nov
19
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
@res: I've looked it up and it's only in the UK where "boy" is the standard pronunciation. I guess I'll let the Americans off, in a to-may-to/to-mah-to kind of way. But it still sounds so wrong to my poor English ears!
Nov
19
comment How to say: “I will try to move it to an earlier time” or what is the opposite of “delay”
+1, since this would have been my answer too!
Nov
19
answered What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
Nov
19
awarded  Supporter