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  • 24 votes cast
Nov
26
comment What is the difference between “ostensibly” and “probably”?
Another upvote for the second of two answers which are much better than the accepted answer!
Nov
23
awarded  Necromancer
Nov
23
comment Why are some words combined into a single word while others stay as two words?
I would have said "anytime" and "sometime" were controversial, also. "My sometime drinking buddy" means my former drinking buddy, but events in the past happened "some time ago". Similarly, I see "any time" a lot more frequently than "anytime", I think.
Nov
23
comment Why does one count mississippily?
@Chris, @JohnoBoy: fair enough guys! I come from a culture where if you can make a pretty good, evidentially-based guess at an answer it's considered a worthwhile contribution to a debate (or at least not a serious offence). I couldn't find any hard-and-fast rules in the FAQ about how sure you have to be of your answers, but since it's at least two against one now I'll make sure not to submit mere educated guesses as answers in future :)
Nov
23
revised Why does one count mississippily?
deleted 25 characters in body
Nov
22
awarded  Scholar
Nov
22
accepted English letter sequence with most pronunciations
Nov
22
comment Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?
In British English we say "this car needs washing" and similar phrases a lot - I can't remember if that construction is normal in the US?
Nov
22
comment Why “ladybird”?
Interesting... I guess it was a "ladybird" and not a "ladybug" in America too at the time then, and it's only recently that the less whimsical-sounding name has truly taken over.
Nov
22
comment Why does one count mississippily?
@Chris Dwyer: what, you'd rather people didn't disclose when they were making an educated guess instead of being 100% absolutely certain of their answer? I'm just trying to build a world where honesty isn't a dirty word. Since (it seems that) my answer was neither misleading nor wrong, I don't really understand the problem you're having.
Nov
22
asked Why “ladybird”?
Nov
22
answered Why does one count mississippily?
Nov
22
answered Is there a difference between “cheers” and “thanks” in colloquial British English?
Nov
22
comment How to remember using “have” instead of “of”?
Darn it, I know the Victorians were onto something with their instance in not ending sentences/clauses with a preposition. "This example of which I thought is much more agreeable, though rather prissy-sounding."
Nov
22
comment How to remember using “have” instead of “of”?
@Dusty: Intervening punctuation marks are hardly fair! Quotation marks also can result in an "of" coming directly before (the infinitive form of) a verb: 'The third person singular form of "to be" is "is".' :)
Nov
22
revised How to remember using “have” instead of “of”?
deleted 7 characters in body
Nov
22
comment How is “admire” used in “to admire them a great deal”?
I wonder if the original poster would have been less confused if he had read "...you admire them a great amount"? "Deal" is obviously quite an archaic word, which really only survives to this day in idiomatic phrases like "a good deal" and "a great deal".
Nov
21
answered Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?
Nov
21
answered How to remember using “have” instead of “of”?
Nov
21
answered What's the difference between “hence” and “thus”?