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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 24 votes cast
Oct
14
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
23
comment More formal way of saying: “Sorry to bug you again about this, but …”
This is by far the best answer - it's completely lacking in rudeness, and isn't overly flowery or long-winded. Polite, clear, to the point!
Aug
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
31
answered What's a word that suggests having very long ears?
Mar
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
3
comment “Complimentary” vs “complementary”
Sure, but I might feel like breakfast in the morning completes my hotel stay package...
Mar
3
comment “Complimentary” vs “complementary”
Good way of thinking about it! Thank you!
Mar
3
comment “Complimentary” vs “complementary”
Yes, I think it is pretty simple to work out which spelling it should be, in any given case. I guess I still feel like "free and on the house" does not completely tally in my mind with the normal meaning of "complimentary", as in, presumably, "like or pertaining to a compliment".
Mar
3
comment “Complimentary” vs “complementary”
But "that dress really goes with your eyes" is complimentary! (Sorry, I'm being a little facetious now ;)
Mar
3
asked “Complimentary” vs “complementary”
Feb
17
comment Is “my bad” a correct English phrase?
@Malvolio: I think all those adjectives do actually specifically qualify "huddled masses"... they're not just being used in isolation!
Feb
11
comment Is “ad hominem” gender-neutral?
Ad feminam is sort of witty, but it also derives from a basic misunderstanding of the Latin (see my answer below). This in turn probably originates from people who think "homosexual" refers to "man-love" and not "same-love". In fact "homo" and "ad hominem", in Latin, have nothing whatsoever to do with gender.
Feb
11
answered Is “ad hominem” gender-neutral?
Jan
6
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
@Atomix: Oh year, Niamh is probably Irish. That would make sense!
Jan
4
comment “With who” vs. “with whom”
Upvoting Kosmonaut's comment. Your sentence is absolutely correct - but it does sound a lot fussier and more pedantic than people like in modern, idiomatic English...
Dec
3
answered Double meaning?
Nov
30
answered “Wanting something to happen”
Nov
30
accepted Why “ladybird”?
Nov
30
comment BBC: “Man convicted of murdering his girlfriend and their 10-month-old daughter at Winchester Crown Court”
Sometimes I think that the BBC staff quite likes trying to sneak little grammatical jokes into the fix. They're pretty good at subversive picture captions, too.