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Feb
5
revised Origin of the exclamation “Jeannie (Genie?) Martins”
edited body
Feb
5
asked Origin of the exclamation “Jeannie (Genie?) Martins”
Feb
5
comment Term for: Simultaneous rare experience/occurrence
I think I would use "pure coincidence" to emphasise the rarity, though I'm not sure if others do this.
Feb
5
comment Is “proximity” a real grammatical rule?
You've assumed the colonel is a man ;)
Feb
5
comment An adjective for the condition of a used brush
I'd probably just use "worn"
Jan
19
comment Phrase when you offer someone something but it's really them who are paying for it
.. with "lunch" acting as a metaphor for practically anything else
Jan
19
comment Phrase when you offer someone something but it's really them who are paying for it
I've always understood "There's no such thing as a free lunch" to mean that even if somebody is paying (it costs me no currency, ergo it is free), they want something from it, whether it be my advice, a favour at a later date, a date. (It costs me in another way, ergo it is not free)
Jan
11
awarded  Famous Question
Nov
30
comment Which is more wet: ‘moist’ or ‘damp’?
@BlessedGeek. Thanks. Thanks for that 😷
Nov
30
accepted Is “A Spanish Learning Grammar” grammatical?
Nov
27
comment Is “A Spanish Learning Grammar” grammatical?
I've never seen that definition of "grammar" so no wonder I was a bit put off.
Nov
27
revised Is “A Spanish Learning Grammar” grammatical?
added 5 characters in body
Nov
27
asked Is “A Spanish Learning Grammar” grammatical?
Nov
12
comment A word for an intentional error or absurdity inserted to check whether audience read an entire passage
Carefully checks question for examples of this.
Nov
2
comment “Let me know it” or “Let me know”
This question is probably better suited to English Language Learners.
Nov
2
comment Is “data” considered singular or plural?
@kappamaki, It seems that it's regional. Both sound natural to me.
Nov
2
comment Usage of without in conjunction with within
In context I understand this usage, but it still sounds very strange to me. Curiously, I also found myself pronouncing it slightly differently, introducing a slight pause before with and stressing out slightly more.
Oct
22
accepted Is mum/mam/mom etc ever capitalised?
Oct
19
comment Are there any simple rules for choosing the definite vs. indefinite (vs. none) article?
I down voted because although this is potentially quite a good answer, it is essentially a "link only" answer. You should include some information from your links so that if the information behind the links is ever changed/lost, the answer still makes sense. See this link
Oct
1
comment What is the name for the glove worn to take out baked food from oven, so that touching the hot tray doesn't burn our hands?
@MaxWilliams, Having done some research for a localised app, I found that Pakistan is closer to British English since it was once under the rule of the British Raj. However, since Pakistani English is a dialect in it's own right, there may have been an answer specific to the dialect.