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seen Feb 18 '13 at 22:11

Oct
12
comment How do you decline nouns borrowed from languages with several categories for declining nouns (or none at all)?
@dainichi: What about possessive pronoun like "his" and "its"? Wouldn't they still count as being genitive?
Jul
18
comment Grammatically correct synonym for “level of catastrophicness”
@JohnLawler: I would think you would stress the fɪs. (I'm just using your notation; I don't know if it's right or not, but I'm pretty sure I know what you mean.) Think "elasticity".
Jun
8
comment How do you decline nouns borrowed from languages with several categories for declining nouns (or none at all)?
@tchrist: From dictionary.com: "the inflection of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives for categories such as case and number." See also Wolfram Alpha's page about declension and Merriam Webster's definition. When you think that someone is incorrect, there isn't a need to use an aggressive tone. It really is okay for everyone to remain calm. :)
Jun
7
comment How do you decline nouns borrowed from languages with several categories for declining nouns (or none at all)?
@tchrist: English also has the oblique case (see the Wikipedia article "Oblique case").
Jun
7
comment How do you decline nouns borrowed from languages with several categories for declining nouns (or none at all)?
@tchrist: The first sentence in the Wikipedia article "Declension" is "In linguistics, declension is the inflection of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and articles to indicate number (at least singular and plural), case (nominative or subjective, genitive or possessive, etc.), and gender."