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Jul
24
comment Acronyms in formal writing
'Should' implies 'appraising authority' implies 'opinion based' implies 'off-topic'.
Jul
24
comment When can verbal passives be used in secondary predicates?
Yes, although the second example sounds odd. Perhaps 'I prefer [having] my garbage taken away each week'.
Jul
24
comment “be kept waiting” vs “be made to wait”
Perhaps [these Google Ngrams](_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%‌​2Cwere%20kept%20waiting%20for%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cwere%20made%20to%20wait%20for%3B‌​%2Cc0) give a more accurate picture by eliminating more noise. Here, instances for 'were kept waiting for' : 'were made to wait for' are just 3:1 in 2000.
Jul
24
comment When can verbal passives be used in secondary predicates?
You're not distinguishing what they call '[3] End-State Secondary Predicates': The cup arrived broken. / The soldiers reached the camp exhausted. / The boy delivered the package wet..... from resultatives: [7] Resulting States He wriggled loose. / We squirmed free. / They shot him dead. / She painted the cabin red. / I pounded the metal flat. / I shouted myself hoarse. / She ran herself ragged. / She ate herself sick. / He drank himself silly.>>
Jul
24
comment When can verbal passives be used in secondary predicates?
That's not how I read the article. The term 'resultative' is used in section 7, but only for states brought about by the action the verb is describing.
Jul
24
comment Verbal analogy: sweet _ness_ is to suffix as boat _swain_ is to … In other words, what is the term for the _swain_ morpheme?
Collins, AHDEL, M-W and RHK Webster's do not flag it as such. Macmillan flags it as 'literary'. ODO is the only dictionary I've found using a bare 'archaic' label. And even archaic words are still words.
Jul
24
comment Verbal analogy: sweet _ness_ is to suffix as boat _swain_ is to … In other words, what is the term for the _swain_ morpheme?
As you think, like 'boat' it's a free morpheme as 'swain' is still listed by major dictionaries, with the original sense or close enough of 'boy' (Old Norse sveinn "boy"). That's if it is still considered sensible to treat 'boatswain' as a compound ('bosun' would prove problematic).
Jul
24
comment Verbal analogy: sweet _ness_ is to suffix as boat _swain_ is to … In other words, what is the term for the _swain_ morpheme?
Swain is listed in major dictionaries.
Jul
24
answered When can verbal passives be used in secondary predicates?
Jul
24
comment British and Canadian but not Coloradan?
But there are restrictions. A '... Britain case report on the first 3-D-printed hip implanted in a human being' is unacceptable.
Jul
24
comment When to put “River” before or after its name and why?
Apparently, Swindale River, Brennand River, Whitendale River, Mells River, Broad River, Pill River, Willet River, Little River, East Lynn River, West Lynn River, Sturcombe River, East Okement River, West Okement River, Abbey River, Trevillet River, De Lank River ... brook the trend [ Wikipedia]. River Wriggle or Wiggle River predictably cuts both ways.
Jul
24
comment British and Canadian but not Coloradan?
@Jack Regier I imagine they opted for style and readability as well as grammatical correctness.
Jul
24
comment How to use the word “magistricide”?
@HotLicks Columbanus, the renowned magistricide detective.
Jul
24
revised word for “splitting time between various tasks”
added 38 characters in body
Jul
24
comment I walked over to the payphone to try to call you
I find it slightly jarring too. With 'went' I'd not have the same feeling. There's a suggestion that walking (rather than hopping) to the phone was part of the necessary procedure; your version shows sequentiality, which does not cause the same frisson.
Jul
24
comment what does “cool with a k” mean?
Kutting-edge cool.
Jul
24
revised Why do native speakers often use delexical structures?
added 94 characters in body
Jul
24
revised Why do native speakers often use delexical structures?
added 94 characters in body
Jul
24
revised Why do native speakers often use delexical structures?
deleted 2 characters in body; edited title