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6h
comment how do verbs come together?
Start by looking at John Lawler's answer and link here: Object or Complement. Then this article of his from UMich includes constructions with the noun phrase between the verbs.
6h
comment What is the word and/or process used to describe mashing two words together or inserting phonetic sounds to create new written words?
Collins has: 'shizzle: (US, slang) (1) adjective See fo' shizzle / (2) noun a form of slang popularized by US rap musicians in which the trailing syllables of certain words are replaced by the suffix -izzle / Word Origin C21: a phonetic blend of sure + izzle'. So, a phonetic blend – but no evidence of 'fizzle' (as opposed to say 'drizzle').
6h
comment What is gender neutral for fraternity/sorority?
Your last sentence is confusing. Wikipedia has: '... some traditionally gender-neutral terms, such as chairman, ... are increasingly seen by some, but not all, as being gender-specific'. These are subjective views, and ' "brotherhood" is considered by some, but not all, to be gender-neutral ' would be better.
7h
comment What is the word and/or process used to describe mashing two words together or inserting phonetic sounds to create new written words?
What do you call words that are misspelled to add effect? and What is it called when words are deliberately spelled incorrectly but pronunciation is kept unchanged? address the second question.
12h
comment Capitalization of first letter of given names inside paragraph
Then I'd (1) ask your supervisor; (2) look at say 10 previous theses. Capitalisation 'rules' tend to be various and contradictory.
12h
reviewed Delete Which is the opposite of pick pocket
12h
reviewed Delete much natural or more natural?
12h
comment A slang word for person who is addicted to mass media promoted pop-culture
Hello, BiblioChic. Answers giving reasonable references are best on ELU. Also, duplicate answers (twit; ditz) should be avoided.
12h
comment Creating words with “-able” suffix
YourDictionary gives 'tileable' (the mathematical sense has been around for many years). Use better dictionaries.
12h
reviewed Reviewed Capitalization of first letter of given names inside paragraph
12h
comment Capitalization of first letter of given names inside paragraph
Hello, Mehmed. If you're writing a thesis, there will almost certainly be a style guide prescribed by the University etc. I'd not capitalise in the first case, but capitalise in the second for clarity – but your authority may instruct you otherwise.
12h
comment What does “I don't suffer from insanity” mean?
The second sentence shows that he's claiming to be insane, probably using comedic licence.
12h
comment What does “I don't suffer from insanity” mean?
No, Carlos. This is humour, a Grouchoesque comment. If you asked 'Are you saying you're mad?" the person would either come back with a riposte or sue you.
12h
revised What does “I don't suffer from insanity” mean?
deleted 4 characters in body
13h
comment much natural or more natural?
I'm not sure I've come across the 'intensifier' label being applied to 'more'. 'Much' when used before a comparative adjective (much faster, much more comfortable) or adverb (much faster, much more quickly) is a secondary or degree modifier. CGEL [2002] [6.3.2] distinguishes between what the authors label the superlative marker (this is the most useful type of hoe) and the intensifying (this is a most useful tool) uses of 'most', so 'more' here would be the 'comparative marker'.
14h
comment What is the purpose of emphasizing indefine article 'a'?
Here, the 'a' is stressed to emphasise that the count noun usage is intended. It's a lot easier and more convincing to show stress using the alternative pronunciation.
2d
comment Is the punctuation of generational suffixes dropped when they occur at the end of a sentence?
I've managed to find a style guide endorsing the omission of full stops after abbreviations where ambiguity isn't an issue. You need to add such a reference, especially with such a contentious issue.
2d
comment Is “No” a complete sentence
@Tim Ward Or 'no' (because the missing implied part deletes the subject and verb that is considered necessary by some: they would call this a 'sentence substitute').)
2d
comment Is “No” a complete sentence
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it has been answered before, as well as showing no research.
2d
comment Is “No” a complete sentence
Hello. IncludeGrammar. (1) This question has been asked and answered here before. (2) You are choosing one definition of 'sentence' in your answer. It is not the only one.