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16h
comment A term for products whose “secret” features are well-known (but not publicized)
This answer is off-label.
16h
comment A term for products whose “secret” features are well-known (but not publicized)
I confess it. I use (split) rubber stick ferrules as clips to keep the shower curtain anchored. And darts as pressure-washer-nozzle cleaners. And holders for washed cutlery as holders for pens etc. And a tea strainer with two clothes pegs as a coffee-filter-paper holder (I can't find a replacement nylon filter). And bike tyre-levers as gardening trowels. But I doubt that these applications are common. I did use foam-backed pan scourers to remove old gloss paint before I saw them marketed for the purpose.
1d
comment Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns?
PerformanceDBA Anyone claiming to be a stickler for traditional grammar but happy to use 'Standards are my friend, in fact I married her.' is worth disregarding.
1d
comment When using an italicized word with punctuation, should you italicize the punctuation, too?
What is the purpose of using both italicisation and quotes?
1d
reviewed Close The meaning of this sentence
1d
reviewed Close “Sacrifice something for something” or “lose something in return for something”?
1d
comment Is it acceptable to use “is become” instead of “has become”?
With 'is become', the language is hardly alive.
1d
reviewed Delete “I haven't got” vs. “I don't have”
1d
reviewed Delete Does the etymology of the word “government” mean “to control the mind”?
1d
reviewed Delete Which is the correct idiom: “Force of habit” or “course of habit”?
1d
comment Can “cattle” be singular?
'Beast' and 'neat' are certainly used. But not very often.
1d
comment What is the meaning of “so not much…, but rather…”?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it assumes that the structure is grammatical (or is a misquote, or ...)..
1d
comment In differentiation as in dy/dx what do you call y and x?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is predicated on the misconception that dy/dx is decomposable.
1d
comment Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns?
@PerformanceDBA You haven't come up with a convincing argument explaining why what you say should be considered as being the correct option. Do you never say 'It's us'? Would you say that your qualifications are better than Professor Lawler's?
2d
revised Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns?
added 3 characters in body
2d
comment Is “Are” always used with plural verbs/nouns?
@PerformanceDBA You'll forgive me if I choose to go with this statement from a previous thread: A huge number of English speakers, even those that are well-educated, use there's universally, regardless of the number of the noun in question, so you will probably not receive any odd looks for saying or writing there's, and if you do, just cite the fact that it can't be incorrect if a majority of people use it. [RiMMER; “There’s” or “There are”?] rather than your insistence on prescriptivism. tchrist also considers the usage not incorrect in certain cases. As do I. And John Lawler (below).
2d
comment A generic word for any 'specialized genre'
'Esoteric' is an adjective that might be applicable. It usually connotes quality, though.
2d
comment Active Voice in Research Without Personal Pronoun
... I'd avoid mixing the passive and the active willy-nilly. I agree that using a lot of we's sounds rather off. Also, using just the passive can sound remote or even alien. Sadly, I feel there's no wonderful solution in the scientific register. Mr Spock's communications were rarely misunderstood because they were imprecise.
2d
comment Is 1.0 singular or plural?
@ supercat 1.0 should be taken as exactly one unless there are indications to the contrary.
May
22
comment Does one say “Where?” or “Where at?”
@Catija While 'Where at?' is unacceptable in response to the example OP gives, Oldbag is at least partly correct in what she says. And the title question licenses her answer. I'd not label 'Where at?' uncommon or 'bad English' in an example with an unspecified venue (her first example), though I'd not think it appropriate for the second example. I can see no fundamental rule allowing sentence-fragment questions of the form 'Where?' but disallowing those of the form 'Where at?' And I'd choose 'Where to?' in response to 'I'm going abroad next week'.