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I'm a retired maths teacher with a degree in chemistry. Like most people, I can spot a flaw in (someone else's) argument more easily than I can substitute a better one. It concerns me that many contributors assume that their / their teacher's / their favourite grammar's ... 'rules' / dogmas / analyses ... are the 'truth'.

I enjoy walking, scenic beauty, many types of music and art, well-written novels, well-plotted dramas, well-notioned SF...

I also believe we've been put here for purpose.


1d
comment Mutually exclusive and not mutually exclusive
The events 'the card I've just drawn is a diamond' and 'the card I've just drawn is black' are mutually exclusive. But the events 'the card I've just drawn is a diamond' and 'the card I've just drawn is a three' are not mutually exclusive.
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comment Is it necessary to repete the prepositions in coordinate sentences?
Note that both "I am happy to go into town and have a pizza" and "I am happy to go into town and to have a pizza" are both quite acceptable, but that the former strongly suggests that going into town is for the purpose of finding a pizza.
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comment “in control of their own destiny”: a contradiction?
The principle sense defined by CDO is the fate-divorced: destiny noun C1 [C] the things that will happen in the future. 'In control of one's own destiny' is of course a contradiction in terms rather than a paradox if the fate-associated sense is demanded.
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comment Why does English have a word for pink?
Most illuminating. More urgently, how are you at mending Christmas tree lights that are on the blink?
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comment What is the meaning of “others” in this sentence?
Surely, beyond a 'strong collocation': a compound noun.
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comment Is there a name to differentiate abbreviations that come before or after the word it refers to or relates to?
The positioning of the abbreviated term in 'Nuits St. George' is not comparable linguistically with that of vs. in 'the Dolphins vs. the Tigers'. One is the middle orthographic word of a three-word proper name, a 'sealed unit'; the other is a preposition, part of a larger construction.
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comment Is the usage 'the message didn't send' grammatically correct?
I'd not argue about the sentiment behind your final sentence; far from it. But not all verbs are normally used in middle / ergative constructions. This book sells well // ?/*This caravan hires well. I'd expect an answer to address the issue of acceptability in a given case.
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comment Using property name in plural instead of its units
I'm assuming Shakespeare wouldn't have been aware of the graduated unit usage. 'This doublet is several sizes too big.' As I say, language usage does shift.
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comment Is there a name to differentiate abbreviations that come before or after the word it refers to or relates to?
diasks2 You're using 'referent' in an unusual way here. St George's Sq is a multi-word compound with (when written this way) initial and final abbreviated terms. 'Nuits St. George' (I've only seen it with the period, so I'll comply) is a multi-word compound with the medial orthographic word abbreviated. As you see, this has two non-abbreviated components (which you misname 'referent/s').
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comment Conspicuous v. Ostentatious
Sunonyms having different shades of meaning?
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comment “As you mentioned” vs “as you said”
There's very little difference; perhaps 'mentioned' evokes a slightly more formal register. I'd include a comma after the comment clause.
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comment A word for 'scared' in this context
It's quite acceptable terminology, as seen in this publication from the University of Hull: Maths phobia and how to beat it / From the Skills Team, University of Hull / This guide aims to discuss the problems people have with learning and using mathematics, and explain strategies to counteract them. ... The fear of maths / Many people have a deep-seated fear of mathematics, and maths tutors see a lot of scared students.
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comment Is there a name to differentiate abbreviations that come before or after the word it refers to or relates to?
But Jim is showing you that a more logical question is 'Is there a name to differentiate words that come before or after the word they refer to or relate to?' And 'relate to' is too general a term for say 'premodifier' to always apply.
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comment Using property name in plural instead of its units
But language usage does shift. This is three sizes too small.
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comment Is the usage 'the message didn't send' grammatically correct?
@J.R. I quite agree with all you say. It certainly passes my ear test, and I agree that one has to be careful about claiming exactly what subjects are acceptable. The snag is that even dictionaries don't agree on many things, and posting according to ear test assessment is far more subjective.
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comment What's the meaning of “out of being an ass”?
No, it is saying that apologising does not magically transform people's present perceptions about you (based on your poor track record). OP's quote is from Rework: Change the Way You Work Forever by Jason Fried, David Heinemeier . Two sentences after OP's is: 'Everything you do before things go wrong matters far more than the actual words you use to apologise.'
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comment Is the usage 'the message didn't send' grammatically correct?
Debate over middle usage / ergative usage aside, have you any authority licensing this usage of 'send' (lack of which is the reason I refrained from submitting an 'answer'?)
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comment Is the usage 'the message didn't send' grammatically correct?
I have seen at least one article reserving the term 'middle voice' for stative usages. Thus middle voice: The Shrunk and Write Grammar sold for $30 back then. / Ergative usage the book sold within minutes (punctive). Normally, ice melts at 0 Celsius. / The ice cube quickly melted.
2d
comment “Whenever I was” vs “Whenever I got”?
According to CDO, talking about the 'get-passive': 'We use the get passive especially in informal speaking. When we use the get passive, we also place a little more emphasis on the nature of the action itself or on the person involved in the action [than we do when we use the ordinary passive].' Surely other {be + -ed form} and {get + -ed form} constructions reflect (or perhaps more probably inform) this difference in emphasis.
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comment Is the usage 'the message didn't send' grammatically correct?
It's a usage that is becoming increasingly common. It's an ergative usage, in this particular case often restricted to the negative: I sent the message / the message didn't send. Compare I cooked the turkey slowly / the turkey cooked slowly. 'The dictionary definitions' is imprecise and potentially misleading. Have you checked in OED?