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3h
comment Another term for oxymorons
@Tonepoet An oxymoron is defined by ODO as A figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction (e.g. faith unfaithful kept him falsely true). What appears on the surface to be a contradiction has a meaningful interpretation when thought about more deeply. A statement like 'There were more than three hundred but fewer than two hundred eggs' is just a contradiction in terms, an absurdity. I don't like the assertion that 'oxymoron refers to any phrase/word group that contains a contradiction'.
5h
comment “graduate from” vs. “graduating from”
possible duplicate of "Will graduate" vs. "will be graduated" vs. "is going to graduate"
8h
comment Whether use of who is proper
possible duplicate of What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?
8h
comment Another term for oxymorons
I don't like the assertion that 'oxymoron refers to any phrase/word group that contains a contradiction'. A compactly stated paradox is a more useful definition; RHK Webster's has 'a figure of speech that uses seeming contradictions, as “cruel kindness” or “to make haste slowly”'. A true contradiction in terms is in no way acceptable.
15h
comment The “to~” infinitive always implies the future, except for preference Like and Love
Look them up here on ELU too (there is better analysis); 'control' and 'raising' verbs need distinguishing. In the examples I've listed, stop to watch can be interpreted as the 'in order to' to, but there is also a hint of true catenation. I'd say this isn't true for say Man eats to live.
16h
comment I be walking down the street with a friend and would answer a question
It's in the piratical. And '... what kind of grammar is using here?' is a non-standard middle usage.
16h
comment The “to~” infinitive always implies the future, except for preference Like and Love
You might like to have a look at the Wiktionary article on English catenative verbs.
16h
comment The “to~” infinitive always implies the future, except for preference Like and Love
The verb 'promise' mandates a future [wrt the time of making the promise] reference. I forgot to go is an obvious counterexample. Your colleague has a point, though; V1 to V2 often involves (at least notionally) sequentiality (decide to eat; agree to help; choose to attend; expect to fail; stop to watch; deserve to be put in prison; need to eat [soon]) though phase and inchoative structures are also common (deserve to be in prison; fail to understand; try to help; need to eat [generic]; seem to be asleep; happen to rain // start to sing; proceed to apply the ointment).
16h
comment Usage of Disproven
@Kris You seem to be missing the point that answering for 'proven / proved' is inappropriate here. And has already been done elsewhere.
16h
comment The “to~” infinitive always implies the future, except for preference Like and Love
Somebody has noticed a partial pattern and has elevated it to rulehood. Statement-banked.
17h
comment US English use of 'motivate'
The ODO 'US English' entry doesn't even mention the usage you mention, whereas their 'UK English' entry at least mentions the usage as being 'South African'.
18h
answered Searching for a word to describe the entirety of something
18h
comment Can “due to” and “because of ” be used interchangeably?
And yes, that should be '... used to respect him', but otherwise, I liked this example.
18h
comment Is there a single word or phrase for something that looks/sounds wrong, but is right?
"Company staff is expert in management ..." uses 'grammatical concord' and is not considered 'incorrect' (though I wouldn't use it).
18h
answered Is there a single word or phrase for something that looks/sounds wrong, but is right?
18h
comment Usage of loss or losses (for undesirable heat produced)
The noun 'loss' is used both as a mass noun and as a count noun. The count noun is used for 'instances of' or 'totals lost' (United's recent losses have been ... / Lib-Dem losses are ... / Shipping losses were at first ...). The plural is unusual with medical conditions (memory / hearing / hair loss). With 'copper loss/es', whichever seems to fit the context better is fine. For 'core ...', you probably know the favoured choice/s best yourself.
18h
comment “This page intentionally blank” … but it isn't!
Ignore this page
18h
comment Can “due to” and “because of ” be used interchangeably?
It's your first sentence (or rather the implication accompanying it) that causes the problem. Imagine trying to analyse say 'weigh anchor' the same way. Idioms are usually non-compositional (though they may once have been transparent). 'Due to', in spite of the meaning of 'due', is often used interchangeably with 'because of'. Yes, often for 'negative reasons' – but there are 460 000+ Google hits for "due to his kindness", eg "Due to his kindness everybody use to respect him." / 300 000+ for "due to the good weather", eg "It is also a good time to go for hiking trips due to the good weather."
1d
comment Correct in context use of IS or ARE
... We'll stick to the National Parks when we're over there, then.
1d
comment Is this strictly a paradox?
It's the usual consequence of applying the scientific method. A hypothesis (here, that the fundamental principles of the Universe demand and explain everything we can observe) is found to be totally or partially wrong (here, as a result of revising the analysis rather than the discovery of counterexamples).