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9h
comment Is there a word that means to see something but not be able to describe?
Gobsmacked has probably already been taken.
9h
comment deleting and---— does it seem strange only to me?
I've found a previous post. 'Conversational deletion' may, as you suspect, not extend to deletion of coordinators; I was mainly highlighting the unsuitability of this style (as used in this particular example) for use in formal registers. The difference between the example given in the duplicate (He called her, emailed her, texted her, tweeted her – all to no use.) and this one (with stacked asyndetons) is marked. I think that perhaps a semicolon as a super-comma after 'stand' might redeem it, but only in a very informal register.
9h
comment deleting and---— does it seem strange only to me?
possible duplicate of Omitting "and" in a sentence
9h
comment What are some words that would make for powerful sounding academic titles?
@John Lawler TP was obviously very familiar with life at a typical university.
9h
revised Is this sentence grammatically correct? Please help :)
added 2 characters in body
9h
comment Is there a difference between “dislike” and “don't like”?
I'll correct my comment. CGEL does say that the pragmatics of the situation are that a bald 'Mary doesn't like you' implicates 'Mary dislikes you', and that the "zero option" 'would normally [be expected to be contextualised. To give an example,]' 'Mary doesn't like you, but she doesn't dislike you either' is an acceptable use of the "zero option". So OP's question needs really needs to be better defined.
10h
comment deleting and---— does it seem strange only to me?
Have a look at John Lawler's post and link on conversational deletion here. 'Let me reiterate that this phenomenon only occurs in speaking English, and in other informal communication systems like email and txting that work like speech. It is not good formal written style, except for reporting dialog in a story.'
10h
comment Is there a difference between “dislike” and “don't like”?
The 'original print version' dates from 1884-1928.
17h
comment Can you use “perhaps” at the beginning of a sentence and omit the verb?
It's a sentence fragment, with conversational deletion. In the UK, GCSE grades are down this year. Perhaps as a result of unwise style choices in writing.
17h
comment How should a question ending in a statement be punctuated, as ending it in a question mark seems a little off?
Will you be able to make a decision on this (as the issue is getting on [for] a year old)? probably looks less 'ill-fitting'. You could also invert. The ill-fitting look probably reflects the fact that the construction itself is rather unwieldy and over-complicated. I'd use 'This issue has been unresolved for almost a year now. Will you be able to come to a decision?' (and this makes the self-referencing first example unnecessary).
17h
comment Your misuse of the apostrophe
Some of us are fascinated that even the 'never use an apostrophe to form a pure plural when dealing with an accepted word rather than a letter or numeral, or word-as-a-word' is not absolute. Fair do's.
17h
comment Is this OK to use more than one and in a sentence
I like bacon & eggs, and fish & chips.
17h
comment Is there a difference between “dislike” and “don't like”?
Not exactly the Royal Family.
18h
comment Is there a difference between “dislike” and “don't like”?
Which version of OED are you citing? When was the relevant article last updated?
18h
comment For computer science, are the files corrupted or corrupt?
This has been said before in comments. An answer is usually expected to be corroborated by supporting evidences.
1d
comment Modal Verbs: HELP
@tchrist Are you running a modal agency?
1d
comment Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09
'Five foot three' is how tall my daughter is, not 'five three'. Conventions differ. However, although 'five past three' is standard (at least in the UK), 'four past three' is not. The minutes is not optional here. // I'm fairly sure this is a duplicate.
1d
comment Is there a difference between “dislike” and “don't like”?
5jj on Using English.com/forum comments wisely, with a good example: Re: Don't like and dislike << Most of the time there is no big difference; we tend to use 'don't like' when 'dislike' might be expected. We possibly use 'dislike' in more formal contexts. It is possible to use 'don't like' with the simple idea of 'absence of liking'; but we then usually add a few words to make our meaning clear: "I don't (really) like Indian food, but I don't (actually) dislike it"..>>
1d
comment Is there a difference between “dislike” and “don't like”?
'Don't like' takes a range of values from -1 to 0, and thus is sometimes as strong in indicating revulsion as 'dislike'.
1d
comment What's a word for someone who wants to voice opinions but not have them challenged?
possible duplicate of Word for someone that always has to be right