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  • 108 votes cast
Dec
9
comment A strange use instance of Present Simple in a sentence
@EdwinAshworth, thank you, you are right, I found this here edufind.com/english-grammar/infinitive, sometimes it is called the zero infinitive
Dec
9
comment A strange use instance of Present Simple in a sentence
Sorry, but this is not the Present Simple, this is called the bare/zero infinitive. Just now I have found this here edufind.com/english-grammar/infinitive
Dec
9
comment A strange use instance of Present Simple in a sentence
I mean there is no such an established term "the bare infinitive", but I'll look into general use of the infinitive. I've never encountered anything similar. I saw 'can + infinitive', 'do + infinitive' but the bare infinitive is something new for me. Thanks
Dec
9
comment A strange use instance of Present Simple in a sentence
some users said that it is not the Present Simple, but the infinitive. Are you sure, that this is the Present Simple?
Dec
9
comment A strange use instance of Present Simple in a sentence
@EdwinAshworth thank you, I have never heard of the "bare infinitive", I'll look some info about it
Oct
23
comment Why do we say “I win” instead of “I won”?
@ColinFine, would you mind if I ask you, why would a person say "I win" as they played the winning move and not I'm winning. As far as I understand English now, from Murphy's English Grammar, present simple is used for some repeated actions. So I win should mean that I constantly, every time win.
Sep
22
comment What does it mean “to ride a number”?
Have I understood this correctly, that this case is similar to the meaning of one in similar situations. The author could write Grown men ride hot-pink ones ? But numbers was used because the style of bicycles is in question.
Jun
12
comment “As part of” versus “as a part of”
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 could you please provide your answer or opinion? I'm really confused with this cause for me the word "part" is a countable noun so it can't be used without a determiner. But recently I began to spot that a lot of native English speakers use it without one, simply "part"
Sep
22
comment Does the word “since” ever have a meaning of “thus”, “hereby” ones?
@J.R., so you mean that since never has a meaning of thus?