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Jul
12
revised How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
added 22 characters in body
Jul
12
comment How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
thanks I am apt to make misteaks such as this ;)
Jul
12
answered How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
May
25
comment What part of speech is “back” in “put the book back on the table”?
I lost the connection or missed your earlier comment. but the 3rd party grammar checker does report accurately and the lookup to the desktop dictionary widget supported my hunch for the explanation so the user could make sense of conjugating the word to understand , aha it is an adverb. Yes I understand "be easier said than done" to "be more easily talked about than put into practice." :)
May
24
comment What part of speech is “back” in “put the book back on the table”?
If you need to be told that "Put" is a Verb, I apologize. the modifier after the Verb is called an Adverb. That's the answer... MAC Air told me the 4 types. the open office add-on said no correction needed. I understand your comment, but teaching is not always about just giving the answer. It's about explaining how to get the answer and let the person make an easier choice. The former method although direct is akin to spon-feeding. The latter is preferred for teaching methods, not just memorizing solutions.
May
23
awarded  Teacher
May
23
answered What part of speech is “back” in “put the book back on the table”?
May
23
revised “Both which” or “both of which”
added 4 characters in body
May
23
revised “Both which” or “both of which”
added 245 characters in body
May
23
comment “Both which” or “both of which”
English is not easy nor was this question. Or let me make that perfectly clear. "OF WHICH" adds clarity, but "OF" is redundant, due to the context within the sentence or the inflection in your voice using a question. IN fact MANY english words are REDUDANT to express an idea. Emphasis is only for Style. YOu might not be able to tell , but I prefer BREVITY. My conclusion says it all, my example was over the top with double meanings. Sorry but I dare you will forget the meaning now that you understand.
May
23
revised Synonyms to “teach a course”
added 100 characters in body
May
23
answered Synonyms to “teach a course”
May
23
revised “Both which” or “both of which”
added 195 characters in body
May
23
awarded  Editor
May
23
revised “Both which” or “both of which”
added 195 characters in body
May
23
answered “Both which” or “both of which”
May
23
awarded  Autobiographer