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location Myrtle Beach, SC
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Aug 4 at 16:19

you get what you put in


May
9
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
10
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
27
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
19
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
19
awarded  Popular Question
May
23
accepted The etymology of “religion” comes from “legere” meaning to read + “re” meaning again. Or does it? (more inside)
May
23
revised The etymology of “religion” comes from “legere” meaning to read + “re” meaning again. Or does it? (more inside)
deleted 1 characters in body
May
23
revised The etymology of “religion” comes from “legere” meaning to read + “re” meaning again. Or does it? (more inside)
deleted 1 characters in body
May
23
revised The etymology of “religion” comes from “legere” meaning to read + “re” meaning again. Or does it? (more inside)
deleted 1 characters in body
May
23
asked The etymology of “religion” comes from “legere” meaning to read + “re” meaning again. Or does it? (more inside)
May
22
awarded  Supporter
May
22
awarded  Student
May
22
awarded  Scholar
May
22
accepted Adjective or noun in “the former”
May
22
comment Adjective or noun in “the former”
merriam webster has no such entry
May
22
comment Adjective or noun in “the former”
the former is england in that case.
May
22
asked Adjective or noun in “the former”
May
22
comment If “latter” comes first, and “former” comes second, what comes third? Or fourth?
Cambridge (ref'd prev 2 edit) is the source of The English Language as we know it from the Oxford/Cambridge press. It's an offshoot of one of the oldest still-existing universities in the world (c. 1300 at least), Oxford, and was created to get away from the "riff-raff" which was presumably Oxford. It's the elitests' elitist university. They all used to know Latin &/or Greek and they basically invented words as they needed them, because they (Oxbridge) were the master editors of The Dictionary. Harvard & MIT have nodded to Cambridge University by renaming their suburb of Boston to "Cambridge".
May
22
comment If “latter” comes first, and “former” comes second, what comes third? Or fourth?
What I want them to do, Mark. What I need them to do. I've run into this problem when discussing things with friends and professionals, sometimes you just need a third word after the "latter, former" series. People are getting smarter, Mark, we need these things.
May
22
revised If “latter” comes first, and “former” comes second, what comes third? Or fourth?
added 623 characters in body