403 reputation
2614
bio website linkedin.com/in/eranmedan
location United States
age 37
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Dec 18 at 21:28

Tech Lead at NICE Actimize

  • Java, Scala, JavaScript, and all that is web
  • Data mining and fraud detection

Oct
5
comment Single-word synonym for a “pedantic rule-follower”?
Oh, this is easy, you call him Sheldon Cooper
Sep
6
comment Is “what's left to do is…” grammatically correct? What is a right way to say it?
What is left is to just say thank you for your help! :)
Sep
6
comment Is “what's left to do is…” grammatically correct? What is a right way to say it?
@Kris - I guess it's my bad English teacher, that told us something about double "Is" in a sentence in a way that confused us. or just my bad English
Apr
5
comment How to say: “I will try to move it to an earlier time” or what is the opposite of “delay”
But how words were added to English? isn't Language human invented after all? Just like prepend is not "real" english but one day it will... isn't it?
Apr
4
comment Is there a better way to say: “My question is, is…” (e.g. “The question is, is it the right time”)
that "that that" example is an example for that that I like!
Apr
3
comment How to say: “I will try to move it to an earlier time” or what is the opposite of “delay”
English is a great language, but if moving something forward in time is delaying, why just "moving it forward" is the opposite? But I can't argue with facts, I assume native speakers won't be confused when I'll tell them to move the meeting forward, however non native speakers might be, as I would have with the axis of time in their mind :)
Apr
3
comment How to say: “I will try to move it to an earlier time” or what is the opposite of “delay”
Thanks, that sounds great, I was just looking for the exact mirror of "I would like/prefer to delay the meeting" but your suggestion sounds better. But please put it as an answer so I can accept it
Apr
2
comment Is the usage of the idiom “Move Over” in this passage clear on what side to move over to?
Actually Driver manuals, and this specifically, do state exactly every exception to any general rule like "always pass on the right", including that it's allowed if the vehicle in front of you is turning left (and more).
Apr
2
comment Is the usage of the idiom “Move Over” in this passage clear on what side to move over to?
I know what the law means, the question is, it is implied by the grammar of the sentence and is there any way in the world someone might mistaken or not be sure to which way, without knowing the purpose of the law
Apr
2
comment Is the usage of the idiom “Move Over” in this passage clear on what side to move over to?
@z7sh: But if I tell you that in another country, when a police car stops on the side of the road, flashing their lights, one should slow down and move to the RIGHT to allow that officer the ability to safely pull that car over, without having to step into the road. It's easy to understand after you hear the explanation, but without explaining, not everyone will guess it
Apr
2
comment Is the phrase “move over” an official English idiom? And if so, is it only in American English?
@Rhodri: Here is the new question: english.stackexchange.com/questions/19133/…
Apr
2
comment Is the usage of the idiom “Move Over” in this passage clear on what side to move over to?
Related to english.stackexchange.com/questions/18328/…
Apr
2
comment Is the phrase “move over” an official English idiom? And if so, is it only in American English?
@Rhodri This is what I was looking for, I'll submit a new question with that clarification and close this one
Mar
29
comment Is the phrase “move over” an official English idiom? And if so, is it only in American English?
Official as in - is ok to be used in legistlative and official legal documents?
Mar
29
comment Is the phrase “move over” an official English idiom? And if so, is it only in American English?
@F'x - If you can send me a letter of unapproval, I'll pay you 250$ :) it may be funny to you, but in Hebrew, you do have such an institution... Also isn't the Oxford dictionary considered the "OBANEI" of English? I'm sure it costs less than 50 euros...
Mar
29
comment Is the phrase “move over” an official English idiom? And if so, is it only in American English?
I'm not a native English speaker, and I recently heard it the first time as part of the traffic "move over law" described as "one must move over one lane", and was thinking it's the same notion as "pull over" e.g. means "move toward" the right lane, and not as "move away" from it. I agree it makes more sense the other way, but without explanation, also the other can in some twisted way (e.g. allow a cop to stop you, which is harder from the left lane)
Mar
29
comment Is the phrase “move over” an official English idiom? And if so, is it only in American English?
My point is, the Georgia "Move Over" law in the driver's manual is saying no more than "One has to move over one lane" and I, as a non-native English speaker, mistaken that (due to confusion with pull over) for moving one lane to the right (e.g. toward the stopped police car) which got me a court order. I'm trying to see if it's only me that is unfamiliar with this idiom, and if I have any case saying it's not something a non-native english speaker would be likely to know.