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Oct
4
awarded  Teacher
Oct
4
awarded  Yearling
Oct
3
answered Single-word synonym for a “pedantic rule-follower”?
Sep
6
comment Is “what's left to do is…” grammatically correct? What is a right way to say it?
What is left is to just say thank you for your help! :)
Sep
6
accepted Is “what's left to do is…” grammatically correct? What is a right way to say it?
Sep
6
comment Is “what's left to do is…” grammatically correct? What is a right way to say it?
@Kris - I guess it's my bad English teacher, that told us something about double "Is" in a sentence in a way that confused us. or just my bad English
Sep
6
revised Is “what's left to do is…” grammatically correct? What is a right way to say it?
added 1 characters in body
Sep
6
asked Is “what's left to do is…” grammatically correct? What is a right way to say it?
Aug
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
1
accepted Which is correct (if any): “please let me know what do you think”? or “please let me know what you think”?
Jun
1
asked Which is correct (if any): “please let me know what do you think”? or “please let me know what you think”?
Jan
29
accepted How to say: “I will try to move it to an earlier time” or what is the opposite of “delay”
Apr
5
comment How to say: “I will try to move it to an earlier time” or what is the opposite of “delay”
But how words were added to English? isn't Language human invented after all? Just like prepend is not "real" english but one day it will... isn't it?
Apr
4
comment Is there a better way to say: “My question is, is…” (e.g. “The question is, is it the right time”)
that "that that" example is an example for that that I like!
Apr
4
accepted Is there a better way to say: “My question is, is…” (e.g. “The question is, is it the right time”)
Apr
3
accepted Is the usage of the idiom “Move Over” in this passage clear on what side to move over to?
Apr
3
comment How to say: “I will try to move it to an earlier time” or what is the opposite of “delay”
English is a great language, but if moving something forward in time is delaying, why just "moving it forward" is the opposite? But I can't argue with facts, I assume native speakers won't be confused when I'll tell them to move the meeting forward, however non native speakers might be, as I would have with the axis of time in their mind :)
Apr
3
awarded  Scholar
Apr
3
comment How to say: “I will try to move it to an earlier time” or what is the opposite of “delay”
Thanks, that sounds great, I was just looking for the exact mirror of "I would like/prefer to delay the meeting" but your suggestion sounds better. But please put it as an answer so I can accept it
Apr
2
asked Is there a better way to say: “My question is, is…” (e.g. “The question is, is it the right time”)