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517
bio website github.com/apsillers
location United States
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Jul 4 at 17:30

"The problem, when solved, will be simple."

Conway's Game of Life

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May
17
awarded  Yearling
Feb
13
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
6
comment “If” vs “Only if” vs “If and only if”
In formal logic, case 1 is Fall => Yell ("If I fall, you must yell"), so a fall must always result in a yell. In strict logical terms, your assertion "No guarantee he will yell if you fall" is not correct, leading you to misunderstand the strict logical meaning of "if and only if".
Nov
28
comment What does refering to someone as a “garden shed” mean?
As evidence, here's an image from inside the shed from the episode that the host is likely referring to: nerdist.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/…
Nov
27
revised Possessives ( 's )
deleted 1 characters in body
Nov
27
answered Possessives ( 's )
Nov
27
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
26
comment Euphemism for poo
@agweber I've personally never heard the phrase used with that particular euphemistic meaning (East coast U.S.), although it's not surprising that it might exist, given that the phrases operates by omitting the thing of which the person was relieved.
Nov
26
answered Euphemism for poo
Nov
20
comment Can “some” be a noun and a subject?
@kayfun This use of an adjective as a noun is sometime called a "substantive adjective".
Nov
20
answered Term for the category which contains Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, etc?
Nov
18
answered What is the word for finishing/doing a dare?
Nov
14
revised “Angels fall, they are towers”: what is “towers” here? Froma poem by G.M.Hopkins
added 189 characters in body
Nov
14
comment “Angels fall, they are towers”: what is “towers” here? Froma poem by G.M.Hopkins
@Kris The main point of my answer should be "the use of towers here is an instance of metaphor" (which I hope you won't find subjective); everything else was meant to be supporting evidence. I'll refactor my answer to be less subjective.
Nov
14
answered “Angels fall, they are towers”: what is “towers” here? Froma poem by G.M.Hopkins
Nov
14
comment The pronunciation of “ate”
Merriam-Webster says both are correct, although it lists the long-A first and the other as a dialect form: "\ˈāt, dialect or British ˈet\"
Nov
6
answered What to call a person with whom you spend time just because?
Nov
1
comment Is “reserved” an adjective or verb in this example?
Here, reserved is a participle: "a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun or noun phrase, and thus plays a role similar to that of an adjective or adverb."
Oct
29
comment What is the origin of Bishy Barney Bee?
FYI, Americans (at least in my experience) call them "ladybugs," and the rhyme is otherwise identical.