701 reputation
214
bio website stackexchange.com/users/39770/…
location New York, NY
age 23
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Apr 16 at 18:04

Senior at Columbia University, majoring in Artificial Intelligence.


Apr
9
comment What is the proper term for a ternary digit?
And a nat is a unit of information in base e. Indeed, another reason that there was research into ternary logic in the '50s was that a trit is closer to a nat than a bit is.
Apr
2
awarded  Enthusiast
Mar
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
26
answered What is an unambiguous single word for a five-pointed star without enclosure?
Mar
11
answered The meaning of “rack” or “rock” in “The Peasant Poet” by John Clare
Mar
11
comment What is the difference between Ukraine and the Ukraine?
That is entirely possible. However, I think we have to be descriptivist when talking about language usage. It would be unusual for English speakers to say "at Jamaica" when talking about the country, and frequency analysis supports that. I still believe that the shift from "at the Ukraine" to "in Ukraine" represents the same change in how people view the political status of the region as the shift between «на Украине» and «в Украине», and so I think the difference in preposition has at least tangential relevance to the question asked.
Mar
11
revised What is the difference between Ukraine and the Ukraine?
Added ngram history
Mar
10
answered ___, ___, and I am/are…
Mar
8
comment You can’t have your cake and eat it too
Source of ngram chart: books.google.com/ngrams/…
Mar
8
answered You can’t have your cake and eat it too
Mar
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
6
answered What is the difference between Ukraine and the Ukraine?
Feb
27
comment What do you call a person who's not yet a customer?
I doubt that the connotation of deception (or worse, assassination), is appropriate for this use case.
Feb
19
answered Beautiful Disaster
Jan
29
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
20
comment Is there a term/word for using an incorrect homophone
"'Hey little boy, what you got there?' / 'Cancer; it's a modest affair.'" -- The Mollusk.
Jul
31
comment “Liquid refuse” or “Liquid waste”?
I would use the word "discharge". I think the organic metaphor makes it suitably repulsive, and I think it fits with the tone you're going for. How about this? "At such inhabitable depths, though, the downpour was mixed with the discharge spilling from the buildings above him."
Jul
30
comment “Liquid refuse” or “Liquid waste”?
There are a number of words that you could use. "Greywater" or "sullage" both refer to water that is dirty enough to not be drinkable, but not dirty enough to be sewage. Depending on the tone of your scene or the voice of your character, you could just describe the water as "nasty", "filthy", "oozy", or use a generic word like "muck" or "gunk". You could also use a whole phrase, such as "the water falling from the rooftops, slimy and disgusting after filtering its way through accumulated filth." Sometimes a single word isn't the best way to capture the emotion of a situation.
Jul
30
revised “Liquid refuse” or “Liquid waste”?
added 50 characters in body
Jul
30
answered “Liquid refuse” or “Liquid waste”?