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Jun
28
asked What's the antonym of “buy-in”?
Jun
27
accepted What's the origin of the idiom “miss the boat”?
Jun
27
asked What's the origin of the idiom “miss the boat”?
Jun
27
comment Word that means to “get something good but loses something else good in return”
or "are there trade-offs for this thinness" works as well?
Jun
27
accepted Word that means to “get something good but loses something else good in return”
Jun
27
asked Word that means to “get something good but loses something else good in return”
Jun
25
accepted What's the origin of the idiom “on the same page”?
Jun
25
asked What's the origin of the idiom “on the same page”?
Jun
18
comment What's the meaning of “roll out” here?
@Kris I absolutely had no idea that the term roll out had a connection with the term let's roll. The term let's roll is readily available in the dictionaries, but the term roll out with the definition of to start an activity can not be found.
Jun
18
comment What's the meaning of “roll out” here?
@Kris It honestly did not occur to me that definition #4 was what the term meant in the context. "to officially launch or introduce a new product or service" sounds so serious to me like some multi-million dollar corporation product launch. The guy was simply trying to resale second-hand items on Craigslist. Anyway, the term is unknown to me and I just wanted a confirmation of its meaning.
Jun
17
accepted What's the meaning of “roll out” here?
Jun
17
asked What's the meaning of “roll out” here?
Jun
12
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
10
accepted What are the distinctions between the insulting names “jerk”, “a--hole”, “bit-h”, “c-nt”, and “dipsh-t”?
Jun
10
comment What are the distinctions between the insulting names “jerk”, “a--hole”, “bit-h”, “c-nt”, and “dipsh-t”?
@Mari-LouA My sole intention is the curiousity of the nuances between the individual terms, and I admit they might be offensive to some, but it's still part of the English language. And by the way, I'm not a native speaker and I'm no longer a schoolboy :)
Jun
10
comment What are the distinctions between the insulting names “jerk”, “a--hole”, “bit-h”, “c-nt”, and “dipsh-t”?
@KristinaLopez I often hear these terms somewhat frequently on discussion boards and was just wondering if there are slight nuances between them. Friends will sometimes jokingly used these words on me like, "you're an a--hole!", or "you are such a jerk!" and I'm wondering do they simply mean I'm an unpleasant person, or do the terms convey something more subtle that I'm not aware of.
Jun
10
comment What are the distinctions between the insulting names “jerk”, “a--hole”, “bit-h”, “c-nt”, and “dipsh-t”?
..because they are stupid or rude.
Jun
10
comment What are the distinctions between the insulting names “jerk”, “a--hole”, “bit-h”, “c-nt”, and “dipsh-t”?
@Mari-LouA I understand they're all nasty insults, but is there a slight nuance between them? For example the insult douchebag although it's defined by Dictionary.com as a contemptible or despicable person, it's commonly understood to mean specifically a person who has an over-inflated sense of self worth, compounded by a low level of intelligence. So I noticed there are subtle nuances between some of these terms and it would be inaccurate to call someone a douchebag for example, if they don't possesses the qualities of a douche and simply..
Jun
10
revised What are the distinctions between the insulting names “jerk”, “a--hole”, “bit-h”, “c-nt”, and “dipsh-t”?
deleted 1 characters in body
Jun
10
asked What are the distinctions between the insulting names “jerk”, “a--hole”, “bit-h”, “c-nt”, and “dipsh-t”?