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Aug
19
revised What would you call this “double entry” principle in English?
hot network questions shouldn't have grammar errors in the title
Aug
19
suggested approved edit on What would you call this “double entry” principle in English?
Aug
10
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
4
awarded  Autobiographer
May
10
awarded  Yearling
Apr
22
comment What is the term for repeating something in an A, B, A fashion? (e.g. “Just the facts, ma'am, just the facts.”)
"Sonata-allegro form."
Dec
31
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Dec
31
awarded  Editor
Dec
31
revised pronunciation of foreign cities
punctuation and capitalization
Dec
31
suggested approved edit on pronunciation of foreign cities
May
10
awarded  Yearling
Feb
3
comment “Not… neither… nor…” word order
@BrightPolyglot: I think reading the not, nor, and neither in that sentence as forming a sequence of three is an error. It reads to me like a two-part sentence: "[I am not now nor have I ever been an oil trader] and [neither has anyone on my behalf]". Similarly, "I am not mean nor greedy and neither am I arrogant" would place arrogance in a different (possibly contrasting) category than meanness and greed. I would suggest that it seems awkward because -- at least in the absence of context -- this is a strange thing to do.
Aug
25
answered “Contemporaneous” vs “simultaneous”
Aug
16
comment Origin of 'fairer sex'
I think this is backwards. "Fair" meaning beautiful is attested even in Old English, while "fair" meaning light-skinned only seems (according to the OED) to date back to the 1500s or so.
Jul
30
awarded  Caucus
Jul
23
awarded  Scholar
Jul
23
accepted Does “eponymous” require that the compared things have the same name, or will a descriptor do?
Jul
22
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
15
comment Why does “bananas” mean “crazy”?
The complete OED quote from that book ("He's bananas, he's sexually perverted; a degenerate.") makes me wonder if it's being used to mean "bent."
Jul
5
answered Rhyme in Elizabethan sonnets