865 reputation
213
bio website jamesbeldock.com
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Jul 6 at 2:48

Itinerant New Yorker, now resident in the San Francisco Bay Area. Undergrad degree in Classics (Greek and Latin) with focus on linguistics, which explains why I run hardware and software engineering in my day job.


May
10
awarded  Yearling
Apr
19
reviewed No Action Needed Single term for “upload or download”?
Apr
19
reviewed No Action Needed People not admitting when things are going bad
Apr
19
reviewed No Action Needed “On the other hand” without the first hand
Feb
3
comment For those who know (who knows)
I really wish there were a way to get Google not to help by modifying search phrases to what is correct. But my understanding is that they actually are more efficient (from a computational perspective) if they don't waste cycles searching for wrong things, so they choose to correct by default and not give the user the ability not to correct.
Feb
3
reviewed No Action Needed Something is “yay” big
Feb
3
reviewed No Action Needed What does 'serval days away from' mean in this sentence?
Feb
3
comment Can this be considered a complete sentence?
Ah, thank you. :-)
Feb
3
comment Can this be considered a complete sentence?
John, that's great and convincing. What's the source for the block quote?
Feb
2
revised Can I say “I have been nourishing my passions”?
Added some older (book) references.
Feb
2
answered Can I say “I have been nourishing my passions”?
Jan
31
awarded  Scholar
Jan
31
accepted Is there a word for replacing foreign words with English substitutes?
Jan
31
awarded  Student
Jan
30
comment “Effect” vs. “Affect”
Unfortunately, there is both a noun and a verb 'affect' and a noun and a verb 'effect'!
Jan
30
reviewed No Action Needed “Rome was not built in a day”
Jan
30
comment Is there a word for replacing foreign words with English substitutes?
Indeed, c'est L'Acedémie Française. :-). They've been accused of being a.k.a. The Department of Curmudgeons.
Jan
30
comment Was making 'dyslexia' hard to spell, a sadistic act?
Concur with Susan's source. Lexikos has its origin in lexis, and I'm not sure about the graphic in the OP's post which claims that lexis is a confusion of L. legere and AGr. legein. The AGr. noun λέξις appears in Plato's Republic and even earlier. So I would lean toward's The etymology Susan has identified.
Jan
30
asked Is there a word for replacing foreign words with English substitutes?
Jan
27
revised What do these two sentences mean in Time's Sports?
Grammatical, formatting, punctuation.