400 reputation
318
bio website lumenaris.com
location California
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 12 hours ago

I play lots of games, develop a few. Check out my publisher's page at lumenaris.com.

Some of my published board/card games:


Nov
30
comment Are the 'Imperatives' used without 'please' or 'kindly' considered to be rude in the west?
Where do you mean by "the west"? The western US? Western Australia?
Nov
19
comment Where do people pronounce “ank” as /eŋk/ vs. /æŋk/?
@JohnLawler, this particular vowel change appears to be far more widespread than the Northern Cities Shift.
Nov
14
awarded  Promoter
Nov
3
comment Why is “doesn't” a legitimate starting word for a sentence?
The phenomenon you're noticing is proof that doesn't is an independent word, not just a contraction of does not, even though it began as such a contraction.
Oct
29
comment Why is there no such word as “percentagely”?
I suggest folding that comment into your answer. It's a very good point.
Oct
10
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
21
accepted 1700s term for “a technology”
Sep
20
comment 1700s term for “a technology”
If you're suggesting "technical device", rather than "technical", go ahead and make that your answer.
Sep
20
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
20
awarded  Yearling
Sep
20
comment 1700s term for “a technology”
This is not only a trend in the last few years. Here's an example from 1950 of technologies being used in the way I'm using it.
Sep
20
revised 1700s term for “a technology”
added 4 characters in body
Sep
19
comment 1700s term for “a technology”
So someone like Jefferson would refer to the printing press as "a mechanisation"?
Sep
19
comment 1700s term for “a technology”
In that source, Johnson considers "technical" to be an adjective. That means Jefferson wouldn't call the printing press, steam engine, and thermometer "three technicals".
Sep
19
asked 1700s term for “a technology”
Sep
17
comment Where do people pronounce “ank” as /eŋk/ vs. /æŋk/?
When you say "this pronunciation", do you mean /eŋk/ or /æŋk/?
Sep
17
comment Where do people pronounce “ank” as /eŋk/ vs. /æŋk/?
When you say "this pronunciation", do you mean /eŋk/ or /æŋk/?
Sep
14
revised Term for aboriginal people of Canada in a historical context
added 139 characters in body
Sep
14
revised Figurative alternative to “have the conch” (the right to speak)
noted that this phrase is in american english as well
Sep
14
suggested approved edit on Figurative alternative to “have the conch” (the right to speak)