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23h
comment What do you call all the pieces of a song minus the lyrics
I strongly suspect you mean "everything except the vocals", otherwise this question doesn't make a lot of sense. I mean, not every subset of anything has a name. What do you call a song without its guitar notes? What do you call a room without its wallpaper?
2d
comment Does “wobble” sound negative?
A quick Google shows that Wobble is the name of a piece of software too. (It's not on Wikipedia, and I'm not going to link to a vendor, so you'll have to Google yourself.)
Apr
30
comment Is there an unambiguous term for “singer or band”?
I'd say artist. What's wrong with "what is your favourite artist?" Provided you are talking about music of course.
Apr
29
comment What non-religious expressions can I use instead of “Thank God”?
@Yvette Off topic, but if you say you're a member of every SE site, I'd expect you to have at least as many communities in your profile as me.
Apr
10
comment English equivalent for the Persian idiom “Putting the drill on poppy”?
I chanced upon the phrase "using a sledgehammer to crack a nut", but I have no idea how much of an idiom that is.
Apr
3
comment What is the word for “the smell of rain”?
@Prashant Pfff, just because Google NGram Viewer doesn't have any entries before 1968 doesn't mean the word is... hey, wait a minute.
Mar
30
comment What is the word for “the smell of rain”?
@ZackT. The OP is not asking after the smell of water.
Mar
16
comment Word for a person who learned something in the past, but is now back down to beginner level?
To me, old hand definitely does not carry the meaning of rusty, not by itself anyway. Your example sentence needs the "but..."; it means something completely else without it.
Feb
25
comment Is there a word for 'a person who is always hungry'?
I typed the Dutch word for someone who's always hungry into Google Translate, and it returned "starveling". Never heard of that word though.
Feb
24
revised Should “japanese” be capitalised when used as an adjective
Inserted linebreaks as intended; removed superfluous thanks
Feb
24
suggested approved edit on Should “japanese” be capitalised when used as an adjective
Feb
24
comment What's the origin behind the phrase “assume room temperature” which means “to die”?
I have never heard this expression to mean this. And Urban Dictionary containing it as slang doesn't mean it's in widespread use. On the other hand, I don't live in an English speaking country, and I never listen to Rush Limbaugh's broadcasts...
Feb
19
comment English equivalent of “c'est gratuit”
If you want something informal rather than fancy words like "gratuitous", how about "for nothing".
Feb
15
comment What is a raspberry?
@MontyHarder Which has been replaced by "challenged". Which will soon be replaced by "special".
Feb
12
comment “To science the sh*t out of something”
Judging from the remarks in the question, "research" or "experiment" was meant.
Feb
7
comment Is it okay to say, “I would rather eat it than look at it”?
On the one hand, I can't think of any example that I'd rather eat than look at. On the other, I believe it best to refrain from asking. I don't think I want to know.
Feb
2
comment What are words that describe “the people” in the same way that “the machine” describes the ruling class?
@DCShannon I will have to listen to that one again, more carefully this time.
Feb
2
comment What are words that describe “the people” in the same way that “the machine” describes the ruling class?
I have never heard "the machine" used for the upper class, the powers that be.
Jan
29
comment Is “times” really a plural noun?
With your reasoning, "one times five" would be incorrect, right?
Dec
8
comment Is “to anagram” an established verb?
Yeah, I know that the OP's sentence was incorrect. Personally I would have used "anagrammed" with double m. Ehm, anyway. I can't cite a rule, your sentence just feels better with was to me. Apparently, my gut feelings are a bit off.