396 reputation
1314
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location Europe, somewhere
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Oct 14 at 15:31

I like to think my English is OK. Or, say, not bad for a foreigner.

That's about it.


Aug
19
comment How and when can we use “why else”?
"Why else would you do it" is another way of writing "why would you do it otherwise".
Aug
14
comment Origin of “go into hock”
That's odd, because the Dutch word hok actually doesn't mean that at all. It can be shed, shack, kennel, coop, closet, cabin, booth, sty, cot.
Aug
14
comment Is “recordee” a word?
By your logic, the word "recorder" would then mean "someone who is recording".
Aug
14
comment “Take a photo” — why “take”?
@Drew machen (make, do).
Aug
13
comment I don't like potatoes or ice-cream
If I were really pedantic, I'd argue you'd be introducing a new ambiguity by using both. Now it sounds like there could be two potatoes, and you hate both.
Aug
10
comment Is it common to use the word “tiptoeing” even if the person is just standing?
The "twisting around" bit does imply that she's actually moving though. I think a case can be made for using tiptoeing.
Aug
8
comment “Canary in coal mine” in a word
This is not a good example. Litmus paper can be reused! Canaries can only die once. Big difference!
Aug
7
comment Describing a group of people who lie down in a public place to send a political message
So, lie-in protesters it is then. Not be be confused with lyin' protesters.
Aug
5
comment What is a word that means “someone who pretends to be your friend but is actually your enemy?”
I'll leave "imposter" here, because it hasn't been mentioned yet.
Aug
1
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
31
comment Appropriate word for internet name of a person
Then I'll throw in nom de plume.
Jul
30
comment Is “Ur-moment” a normal English expression?
The German Wiktionary page implies that it's a prefix meaning simply "from". For instance, Ursprung, "origin" or "source", comes from the older verb erspringen, "to spring from".
Jul
28
comment Does capitalization change the meaning of the word coke?
Stupid question, but what do Southerners say when they mean Coke? Cola?
Jul
28
comment Is it correct to use “for” with “required”?
I'm not sure I would use "required" in this situation. Maybe "requested".
Jul
28
comment Sentence in which “its” and “it's” can be interchanged without changing the meaning?
Hm, and how does this differ from George's answer from yesterday?
Jul
28
comment Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?
On re-reading the question, maybe your friends were commenting on your use of the "so" in "so delicious". Just "delicious" will do.
Jul
27
comment A word or phrase for 'Holy grail' (a goal impossible to achieve)
How about "unobtanium".
Jul
26
comment A word or phrase for 'Holy grail' (a goal impossible to achieve)
I'm sure I would recognise the figurativeness of "golden fleece" if it was in quotes.
Jul
26
comment Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?
On the other hand, occurrences of anorexia nervosa are higher in the US than in non-Western countries.
Jul
26
comment Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?
Apart from the question of frequency, keep in mind that "yummy" is VERY informal. When in doubt, I'd recommend using "delicious" or "good".