457 reputation
25
bio website stevendesu.com
location Kentucky
age 24
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Jan 13 '12 at 20:19

I like to code. That's about it. I prefer web-based applications. PHP, MySQL, HTML, CSS, JavaScript... I can also code in Perl or Python for shell automation and C++ when I need something to run fast. I'm learning ASM. I'm a Computer Engineering graduate with a Masters in Business Administration. Math and algorithms come easily for me. Art and graphics do not.

I'm also a certified Mac Genius. Summer jobs. Whee. I don't own a Macintosh, but I can tear them apart, rebuild them, and fix just about any problem with them.


Nov
14
awarded  Yearling
Nov
14
awarded  Yearling
Nov
16
comment Why are the United States often referred to as America?
There are plenty of other countries which use similiarly ambiguous terms in their country name, however. The "Union of Soviet Socialists Republic" There are plenty of socialist republics. What is to stop us from calling Canada the "Union of American Socialists Republic"? There's also the "Central African Republic", "Democratic Republic of the Congo", "Federated States of Micronesia", "United Arab Emirates", "United Kingdom",...
Nov
16
answered Why are the United States often referred to as America?
Nov
16
comment Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns
Also, while web log (log being a noun) provides a counter-example ("I'm blogging this"), I don't see how section II has a clearly identified verb. Also, airmail is just a compound word formed of air and mail, not a contracted noun phrase. The argument isn't whether a noun can be used as a verb, but whether a noun phrase (in which an adjective clearly identifies it as a noun and not a verb) can be used as a verb.
Nov
16
comment Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns
My evidence is the very reason for this thread. E-mail is short for electronic mail. Since electronic is an adjective, this provides sufficient proof that mail (in this context) is a noun. Therefore if you say "email me", you're saying "electronic mail me", or "[adj] [noun] [pronoun]". There is no verb in this sentence, hence it's a fragment- or incorrect. The argument made against me is that after being contracted, the shortened noun phrase can act as a verb in its own right, just as "mail me" is acceptable.
Nov
15
comment Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns
"Technically incorrect", as I used it originally, means that grammatically it's not correct even though it's commonly accepted. It's incorrect on a technicality.
Nov
14
comment Comparative and superlative adverbs?
Would someone mind explaining the down vote? I thought the explanation was quite clear. ly turns adjectives into adverbs but cannot be used on adverbs. Then a superlative is formed from an adverb in one of two ways depending on if it's an adjective+ly adverb or an adverb in its own right.
Nov
14
comment What does the word “rich” mean in the reactionary sarcastic phrase “That's rich!”?
Actually, "that's rich" does generally mean amusing. It's a sarcastic phrase in which you are saying their fallacy has amused you. Taking Acorn's example: I'm greedy? That's a bit rich, coming from you! - this implies that you are amused the person would find you greedy.
Nov
14
comment Use of the word “that”:
There's actual a minute difference, but right now I can't remember it. I believe it was to the effect of "that" implying paraphrasing, whereas without it you imply his actual words.
Nov
14
answered *all of us's friend
Nov
14
comment Is “Stick no bills” correct English?
It must be regional. I've never heard "post no bills" or "stick no bills" in my life. I live in Kentucky.
Nov
14
comment Is “Stick no bills” correct English?
Technically "no smoking" and "no turn on red" are fragments, but any listener understands they mean "no smoking is allowed" and "no turn on red is allowed", respectively. Although I can't speak for "stick no bills", as I've never heard this term before.
Nov
14
comment “Ironic” vs “ironical”
I always thought of the difference as being more or less immediate in exactly what has irony. A novel can be ironic, meaning that there is irony somewhere in the novel, or possibly through-out it. A sentence can be ironical since the sentence itself contains the irony. However we know ironical must be word since ironically is a word, whereas ironicly is not. This also supports my previous claim since an object which only indirectly has irony (like the novel) does not directly do something in an ironical manner. Only the specific sentence says something ironically.
Nov
14
comment Can “drive someone home” be used when the vehicle is a motorbike?
Martha: I don't believe I've ever heard it used natively, either, but it's grammatically correct and I was simply trying to construct a correct sentence with a structure closely approximating his. "ride someone (my friend) home".
Nov
14
awarded  Commentator
Nov
14
comment Usage evolution of “indubitably”
mickeyf: More syllables doesn't always mean used less often or more pretentious. Consider less-used one-syllable words like rue or vie. People generally tend towards regret or compete. Why one was chosen over another could be any number of reasons over hundreds of years, so it's really hard to say.
Nov
14
comment Usage evolution of “indubitably”
I think you missed one important part. indubitable ends in able. undoubted simply ends in ed. A word ending in able implies that it is possible. Therefore by appending in (not), it "is not possible" to doubt. By appending in (not) to doubted, however, there is no suffix that implies possibility. Consider instead undoubtable. By adding able we've given it the same meaning as indubitable.
Nov
14
comment How to describe relations between objects unambiguously?
While more sentences almost always provides less ambiguity, comparing the question with his previous one (on making compound sentences), I believe that the first two examples would suit him better than the third.
Nov
14
comment Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns
I'm interested to see what comes out of this question. In my opinion the longer form should always be considered. English teachers still argue today that "ATM machine" is redundant. Why should "email" be a verb? If there's resounding disagreement, though, I'll have to cede the point.