Reputation
408
Top tag
Next privilege 500 Rep.
Access review queues
Badges
4 9
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~7k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 7 votes cast
Apr
23
awarded  Yearling
Apr
23
asked How can something be “set in stone”?
Mar
4
accepted Does the “rule of the last antecedent” apply to casual conversation?
Mar
2
comment Does the “rule of the last antecedent” apply to casual conversation?
Wow, that's a great example.
Mar
2
asked Does the “rule of the last antecedent” apply to casual conversation?
Feb
24
comment Can native English speaker tell the differences between [ɣ] voiced velar fricative and [g] voiced velar stop?
My advice would be to record yourself saying "Give me a bag of angry tigers", then find a friend whose native language is also Vietnamese but claims to be able to pronounce [g] correctly and have them record the same sentence. Then the native English speakers here can comment on whether the g sounds are clearer in one of the recordings.
Feb
7
comment Word for the bias of a profession towards itself?
@JohnLawler After giving this a few months of thought, I'm convinced that parochialism is the best choice. Alas, it's not an answer! If you'd make it one I'd be happy to accept it.
Jan
29
comment How do you pronounce the << operator
I pronounce it just like it's spelled.
Nov
25
awarded  Curious
Nov
24
awarded  Commentator
Nov
24
comment Word for the bias of a profession towards itself?
@JohnLawler interesting, that does seem to be related. I had been looking over Wikipedia's List of cognitive biases and not finding anything, but maybe this isn't really a cognitive bias; after all, it doesn't necessarily lead to any inaccurate beliefs, just skewed preferences.
Nov
24
asked Word for the bias of a profession towards itself?
Nov
17
comment Why is “toast” uncountable?
I'm not sure that I agree that "put a toast in it!" necessarily indicates that it is being used as a countable noun; I might ask you to "give it a fizz", or to "take the chill off", or note that the fire "has a nice warm glow", but these are not countable things.
Nov
9
comment Suitable saying for “different people like/dislike different things”?
Whatever floats your boat.
Nov
5
asked What's the “textbook” way to write a passive sentence with a phrasal verb?
Nov
4
comment How did “run over him” evolve to “run him over” over the last 50 years?
It's probably relevant that "over" in "ran him over" sounds like a complement, ie the emphasis is on the impact rather than the process (making it sound more destructive).
May
16
accepted A word like “confession” for relating personal details but lacking connotations of guilt?
Apr
16
asked A word like “confession” for relating personal details but lacking connotations of guilt?
Feb
26
comment What is meant by “steep learning curve”?
Those definitions are not opposite. Learning quickly does not mean that the end goal is easy, just like learning slowly does not mean that the end goal is hard (my learning curve for playing trombone is very shallow indeed, but that's because I've never touched the instrument). How fast you acquire knowledge is unrelated to how much knowledge is required to achieve your end goal.
Feb
25
awarded  Notable Question