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7h
reviewed Close When do I use “are” instead of “is”?
7h
reviewed Close Is 'theris' a 3rd person plural possessive pronoun?
7h
reviewed Close “Didn't” or “Wouldn't”?
7h
reviewed Leave Closed Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
10h
revised Subjunctive that has no subject?
edited tags
10h
comment Subjunctive that has no subject?
Come the day this sentence has no subjunctive, I’ll eat my hat. And be it for good or ill, the subject isn’t you here, either.
10h
comment Subjunctive that has no subject?
Come rain or come shine, this is still a standard case of concessive disjunction, an old formula that takes inversion and the old present subjunctive that’s virtually unseen today outside of fixed phrases.
10h
comment Subjunctive that has no subject?
possible duplicate of What is the grammatical construction in “Be but sworn”?
1d
comment Non-standard British use of possessive “me”
I think you are confusing speech with writing, and with eye-dialect writing in particular. But so is the OP. I never confused the Geordie pronunciation of my in a way that's homophonous with me in a way to think those were the same word. They just sound the same there. So does the one in doh-re-mi, but that is still a different word, in the same way.
1d
comment Non-standard British use of possessive “me”
It’s not special, and it’s not rare. @Fumble has the right of this matter here. It is simply an alternate pronunciation, and one documented by the OED, too.
1d
comment Non-standard British use of possessive “me”
There’s a lot of confusion about this. It’s simply the unstressed pronunciation of my as /mi/ not /mai/. Unstressed words are subject to reduction, and here it is the diphthong getting reduced. So they are still saying my; it just has a different pronunciation. This is the same thing that happens with how “Tell ’m not to come” is still using the word him or them, merely pronounced differently in an unstressed position.
1d
comment Is 'theris' a 3rd person plural possessive pronoun?
If they’ll show you theirs, you can show them yours.
1d
comment “Wrong” or “wrongly”?
In English, we distinguish the comparative degree from the superlative. Therefore if you have two things, neither is able to be the “most” of anything. It can only be “more” of something. But I don’t think you have put into words your actual question.
1d
reviewed Close Proper use of 'aspects' in a descriptive sentence
1d
reviewed Close How to say thank you to a friend who agreed to take care of my pet?
1d
reviewed Close Referred as … below
1d
reviewed Close Driving across versus driving through
1d
reviewed Close 'That is' versus 'That was'
1d
reviewed Close What is the object of this sentence?
1d
reviewed Close Is the use of investigating in the sentence grammatically correct?