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May
3
reviewed Looks OK “Seeking for an answer” or “seeking an answer”
May
3
reviewed Reject and Edit “is” or “was” - “Defendants asked whether Claimants' case is/was that the agreement is binding”
May
3
revised “is” or “was” - “Defendants asked whether Claimants' case is/was that the agreement is binding”
added 16 characters in body
May
3
comment Which is correct “I wished I was a painter” or “I wished I were a painter”?
You will never get the answer you want because it does not and cannot exist: language is not mathematical law. Different people say different things at different times to convey not just different things but the same thing. There is no right or wrong possible here, only peeving. All of I wish/wished she was/were/had been/would be here occur in the wild, and I wish you would please accept that and move on.
May
2
reviewed Edit and Reopen Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?
May
2
revised Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?
added 223 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
May
2
reviewed Delete Is there a way to condense “put back” into one word?
May
2
reviewed Approve A word that simultaneously means caring and not caring?
May
2
reviewed Approve Any alternative to “on the one hand, on the other hand”
May
2
comment How common are adjectives on -ly?
There really are hundreds of these. Some like only and wiley aren’t so strange given one-ly and wiles. But there are plenty of “exceptions”. Early birds were never once earls in an earlier age. Holy relics need not be perforated. Silly thoughts are not confined to window ledges. Ugly paintings are rarely ogled. Lonely hearts, lively company, lowly ambitions, measly portions, and portly barkeeps are all something else — as too are wobbly chairs and niggly nuisances which come from verbs. And jelly beans is probably today best thought of as a noun–noun compound.
May
1
comment Is it correct to start a sentence with the infinitive of a verb without the “to”?
@JanusBahsJacquet Some of these feel like stealth conditionals: “Be here by nine and win a free doughnut!” => “Should you be here by nine, you will win a free doughnut”. I don’t think either of those is much of an imperative. “Get it in 2 days for only $5 more” => “For only $5 more, you will get it in 2 days”
May
1
reviewed Leave Closed English words mockingly derived from French?
May
1
comment How to pronounce “p” in “hospital” and why?
@RobertKaucher Done.
May
1
answered How to pronounce “p” in “hospital” and why?
May
1
comment How to pronounce “p” in “hospital” and why?
You are right that there is more going on than that, but there is only so much room in comments. :) Another demo is to get a Spaniard to pronounce un pan: the first n becomes [m] but the second one [ŋ] or [ɴ] or disappears altogether, leaving a nasal [ã] behind. Indeed, if you make them say the simple word un in isolation, it will never end in [n] at all and you may well be left with nothing but [ũ].
May
1
comment How to pronounce “p” in “hospital” and why?
@keshlam That is not an error: it is the only correct way to do it! It is required to pronounce something spelled un perro as though it were spelled um perro in Spanish. Saying un there is wrong. Nasals /n/ and /m/ neutralize before a consonant and are always subject to regressive assimilation in Spanish. Think of it as an archiphoneme |N| with many expressions. Read the fine print about /m/, /n/ going to [m], [ɱ], [n], [ɲ], [ŋ], [ɴ]. You are making a similar mischaracterization here about English.
May
1
comment How to pronounce “p” in “hospital” and why?
I think you are confusing what is happening here, and then mischaracterizing it as wrong. It is common for English speakers to misperceive an unaspirated unvoiced consonant as being a voiced one when it is truly not. As for Spain, what is the particular “wrongness” you are referring to? Something like hablado > hablao, fuego > fogo, luego > logo, croquetas > cocretas?
May
1
revised UK English pronunciation of word “language” please?
added 4 characters in body
May
1
reviewed Edit Alternatives to “Such As”
May
1
revised Alternatives to “Such As”
improved formatting