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Jul
4
revised Why are there two pronunciations for “either”?
edited tags
Jul
4
comment About the ending “-tive”
I cannot tell what your actual question is here. Please edit for clarity and error. The OED attests more than a bazillion adjectives ending in -tive. Did you somehow think that sequence actually has intrinsic meaning of its own? There isn’t, because -tive is not an English suffix.
Jul
4
reviewed Leave Closed Is there an idiomatic phrase that means that one is in “total agreement”?
Jul
4
reviewed Leave Closed What does “… which is somewhat long in tooth” mean, and what is the source of the phrase?
Jul
4
reviewed Leave Closed Is the construction, “He is a great player, is Tendulkar” grammatical?
Jul
3
revised Tolkien and archaic English
Added citations from Waldman letter
Jul
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
3
comment Tolkien and archaic English
@bilbo_pingouin ‘Typical’ use is bogus not real, and it abounds in trash fantasy. Tolkien is atypical insofar as his use of such is authentic not bogus.
Jul
3
revised Tolkien and archaic English
added 5640 characters in body
Jul
3
comment Tolkien and archaic English
Oh, 1914 not 1814! That’s different. Me, I hold in especial contempt all the pseudo-archaic crap perpetrated by dumb hacks who’ve no earthly idea how English was actually spoken even two centuries ago—let alone four or eight—and whose nonsense completely destroys any possible suspension of disbelief. Those books I consign to the fire with extreme prejudice. Say what you will, but Tolkien never committed that atrocity: his use is always legitimate and to me at least believable. As for Rowling, I don’t believe she was employing the auctorial conceit of the “found manuscript out of antiquity”.
Jul
3
revised Tolkien and archaic English
deleted 8 characters in body
Jul
3
comment Is there a word to encompass the two states of a day: AM and PM, morning and afternoon?
Exact duplicate of A single term for the duration between sunrise and sunset?.
Jul
3
comment Tolkien and archaic English
@JanusBahsJacquet I accept your general point and appreciate your nuance of layering used for quoted speech. But do you honestly believe some hypothetical 1814 reader would find “both syntax and vocabulary outdated”? That seems strongly worded. I question whether Tolkien’s 20th-century-isms would have even been accessible to that reader of lo these two centuries now past. The rare exception used for effect as “foreign” words are never syntax, only nouns like mathom and dimmerlaik. Those cannot be what you mean, though, so I wonder where you are coming from. Some examples, please?
Jul
3
revised Tolkien and archaic English
added 329 characters in body
Jul
3
answered Tolkien and archaic English
Jul
3
comment For word pronunciation that have 2 consonants standing next to each other and at the end, Do we have to fully aspirate both of them?
This should probably go on the other posting, but it also seems relevant here: the aspiration becomes more obvious when one considers homophone(?) pairs like face topping and faced hopping, but probably not face stopping which should lack it. You can also play games with devoicing assimilation in related cases
Jul
3
comment How do you say “make a stack from a pile of sheets of paper” in one word?
Understand that "u" may be considered offensive enough on ELU to attract downvotes just for being so tacky/rude/disrespectful/negligent.
Jul
2
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
2
comment Linking: Sibilant with Other Sibilants (was + starting)
Might be some assimilation.
Jul
2
revised What is the word for the small elements that make up an orange segment?
added 54 characters in body