52,409 reputation
8101203
bio website perl.com
location Boulder, CO
age 51
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen 50 mins ago

profile for tchrist on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites

I’m Tom Christiansen, author of Programming Perl and Perl Cookbook from O’Reilly. I’m a freelance instructor giving courses in Perl programming, including Unicode and regular expressions. I’ve been using BSD Unix for 30 years now; like your maid, I don’t do Windows.

I’ve undergraduate degrees in Spanish and in Computer Science, and a graduate degree in compsci focusing on operating systems design and in natural language processing. I’ve studied Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, Latin, and German, with a smattering of other languages thrown in. For the last few years I’ve been dabbling in computational linguistics.


1h
reviewed Delete What is meant by “same difference”?
1h
reviewed Delete What is the meaning of the phrase 'Here be dragons'?
1h
reviewed Delete What's the accusative absolute?
1h
reviewed Reviewed There is (there's) vs.There are
3h
reviewed No Action Needed Is there any difference at all between these three sentences?
3h
reviewed Reviewed A word or phrase for 'Holy grail' (a goal impossible to achieve)
3h
revised A word or phrase for 'Holy grail' (a goal impossible to achieve)
copyedit
3h
reviewed Reviewed Better term for “intellectual jokes”
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revised Better term for “intellectual jokes”
copyedit
3h
comment from a non-native standpoint: Which dictionary should I side with, when they are semantically standing in the face of one another defining a word?
We don’t say tens of cases in English; we say dozens.
5h
comment Difference between “Warm regards” and “Best regards”
Wouldn’t you worry that this might come off as formulaic and therefore insincere?
5h
comment What's this word?
@bye It’s just as off-topic as any question about a typo. It will not help anybody else, ever. This therefore does not add value to the site. Actually, strike that: it’s much worse than a typo, because it does not embed the questioned material, but relies on some offsite ephemeral link whose continued existence we cannot guarantee. If we open ourselves to this sort of per-hearer question, the flood of billions and billions of questions from non-native speakers who simply do not understand what they are hearing will be unstoppable. This therefore subtracts value from the site.
5h
comment Is there a word to describe the positioning of words directly below other words, as in translations
Because human language is a combinatoric art rather than a crossword puzzle, we normally do and should use multiple words to describe elaborate concepts.
5h
revised Is there a word to describe the positioning of words directly below other words, as in translations
Added explicit inline textual reference to cited text per explicit requirements of http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/a/4981 and our Help Center’s section on “How to reference material written by others” at http://english.stackexchange.com/help/referencing.
5h
revised Is there a word to describe the positioning of words directly below other words, as in translations
Added explicit inline textual reference to cited text per explicit requirements of http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/a/4981 and our Help Center’s section on “How to reference material written by others” at http://english.stackexchange.com/help/referencing.
6h
revised Professional term for “Apples to apples” comparison
Per http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/a/364 for the use–mention distinction, please use an italic face not a bold one. It makes the page look too heavy otherwise, and furthermore runs counter to typographic convention both on this site and in scholarly works.
6h
reviewed Looks OK Professional term for “Apples to apples” comparison
6h
reviewed Delete Is there a verb meaning “to make similar”?
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comment What's this word?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about one specific person mishearing one particular word in one particular recording, and so is extremely unlikely to help further visitors to the site.
6h
revised Professional term for “Apples to apples” comparison
Per http://meta.english.stackexchange.com/a/364 for the use–mention distinction, please use an italic face not a bold one. It makes the page look too heavy otherwise, and furthermore runs counter to typographic convention both on this site and in scholarly works.