321 reputation
210
bio website wchargin.github.io
location United States
age
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 17 hours ago

Good at Java, C, Python; familiar with Ruby, JavaScript, HTML, CSS.


Sep
24
comment What does “the storm booming without in solemn swells” mean?
@tchrist Well, without isn't used in its most common sense, so that's probably the confusion (although comparison with within shouldn't make it too difficult).
Aug
26
suggested suggested edit on Proper term for knowing four or more languages?
Jun
8
comment What do these sentences mean in “The Picture of Dorian Gray”?
We can also call a work that is "really about oneself, or revealing of oneself" roman à clef.
May
29
comment What word would be used for someone who shoots video
@keshlam Confirmed: it's in the OED as a derivative of videogram.
May
24
comment How would you describe this hair?
I think he means more the clumped nature than the tousled nature.
May
24
comment Are there English equivalents to Japanese word, ‘有名税-Tax on the famous’?
Interesting that the literal translation of 有名税 is "have name tax"—that is, a tax on those who have names.
Mar
2
comment Is “Know how to cook leeks”an idiom? What does “Read “Hamlet” and know how to cook leeks” mean?
Yep. On the other hand sometimes it underestimates them on the last page: doing a search for "PHP" yields 25 billion results, but jumping to the last page (page 39) takes that number down to 390. Obviously there's far more pages on PHP than that. Also interesting that they limit it to 39 pages anyway, so it doesn't matter if there's a trillion hits - you won't see them.
Mar
2
comment Is “Know how to cook leeks”an idiom? What does “Read “Hamlet” and know how to cook leeks” mean?
Now, suddenly, we're up to 21,500 results for "know how to cook leeks"! Once you actually go to page ten, though, the number drops to 33...
Feb
13
comment What's an accurate easy-to-understand way of referring to the brown outer part of a fried egg?
I would actually peg this as "not easy to understand" for two reasons: (1) eggwhite contains white, when the subject in question is brown; (2) caramelized refers to a specific process whose effects (browning) may not be known to the audience. In other words, it requires too much thought.
Jan
14
comment “I like it that” vs. “I like that”
These sites (DeAnza college, University of Pittsburgh, Portland Community College) are the top three Google results for noun clause with that site:edu and all demonstrate the same structure. Wikipedia agrees, as does Dictionary.com. It's simply the definition. What do you think a noun clause is?
Jan
8
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
15
comment “I like it that” vs. “I like that”
Wouldn't "that you speak French" be a noun clause, and so the sentence would be "I like [noun]," which is certainly correct?
Nov
17
comment There seems to be a subtle difference between the infinitive form of the verb 'to be' after a verb and the inflected form of the same; what is it?
By the way, the second phrase should be "John claims that he is...," using a noun clause.
Sep
8
asked What ten-letter word means “having lots of time”?
Aug
28
comment Job or work history. How correct?
@bib well, it also applies best in this specific circumstance.
Aug
26
revised Word for “of or relating to God”
clarify
Aug
26
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
26
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
26
accepted Word for “of or relating to God”
Aug
26
comment Word for “of or relating to God”
I meant scientific only in the context of having scientific precision, a word that would describe the phenomenon from an unbiased (if not objective) point of view.