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Jan
4
comment The rain is “lifting”
In addition to the other comments/answers, rain can lift in the sense that it stops reaching the ground. That is, it falls as rain from a cloud but evaporates before reaching the ground. This is called virga and is quite common. (Although virga almost always occurs before any rain, rather than after.)
Dec
23
awarded  Yearling
Dec
23
revised Meaning of “win-the-cycle crap”
added 809 characters in body
Dec
23
answered Meaning of “win-the-cycle crap”
Nov
19
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
10
revised Is there a way to clearly identify text meant in jest?
Focused text, removed words that trigger profanity bots.
Nov
9
suggested approved edit on Is there a way to clearly identify text meant in jest?
Sep
17
comment Coordinative ellipsis with not and unparellel structure
@JohnLawler : "I worked, not played" is perfectly correct and clear. No do needed. ... Personally, I prefer: "I worked and knot-played." ;)
May
30
comment What do you call a person, who needs to stay active in order to feel comfortable?
"Annoying​‌​‌​‌​‌".
May
30
awarded  Excavator
May
30
revised Who were the 'pros from Dover'?
Link was not actually a link (clickable) for some reason.
May
30
suggested approved edit on Who were the 'pros from Dover'?
May
9
comment Word for the “life/world” outside phone calls, text messages, and the Internet?
The "Meatspace" domains have all, of course, been reserved. (^_^)
May
7
accepted Does “anathema” need an “an”?
May
6
comment Does “anathema” need an “an”?
The Vulgate has: "si quis non amat Dominum Iesum Christum sit anathema maranatha", so the English may just be a (slight) mistranslation, omitting the article as happened from time to time?
May
6
comment Does “anathema” need an “an”?
Hoping for a more authoritative answer, but will accept this one in a day or 2 if nothing better comes along.
May
6
comment Does “anathema” need an “an”?
Not feeling this answer yet. (1) That Bible example is a misquote. The actual phrase is ..., let him be Anathema Maranatha. (KJV, with most other English versions having the Maranatha in some form) So, this may just be an early misuse or a deliberate, one-time, poetical construction. ... (2) The "factitive" examples do not hold, as those are all formal titles in context. "Anathema" is not a formal title AFAICT. ... (3) Euphony might be okay, but that would also excuse all kinds of pigeon English that's not considered grammatically correct (yet).
May
3
awarded  Notable Question
May
2
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
2
asked Does “anathema” need an “an”?