324 reputation
311
bio website jedoliver.com
location Chico, CA
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Jul 8 at 4:25

I live in California. I write. I game. I cook. And I'm a Dad.


Apr
30
comment Specific word for discrimination based on religion
I'm not so sure. Racism tends to indicate a bias towards/against a specific race. Antitheism on the other hand tends to indicate a bias against all religions (or at least against theism, ie the belief in god or gods).
Feb
3
comment Is there a word to refer to “changing TV channels”?
I always liked surfing for the choosing of channels. I.E. "She surfed over to the news." Very visual word. Alternatively, avoid the rather passive activity altogether and simply imply the action has occurred. "I don't now how it happened or why but the next thing I knew the remote was in her hand and we were watching the news." Of course that's more Writers than EL&U, but I digress.
May
26
comment Word for a shop which sells materials used in making clothing
and it's sergers, not surgers. Source: see above
May
26
comment Word for a shop which sells materials used in making clothing
Just to answer the entire first part of the question, which is lacking sorely from your response: The word for materials (zippers, buttons, etc.) that go into homemade clothing is notions. The pattern will list how much and what type of fabric you need and the quantity and type of notions you need so you can go to the fabric store and buy them. Source: Me, I make clothing and stuff
May
4
comment “Nation”: place or people?
@J.R. I think you might be better off using the phrase "A child fills his tiny world" instead. But if you want better suggestions on metaphor, I would consider asking this question in writers.stackexchange.com instead.
May
4
comment “Nation”: place or people?
If you're seeking advice on how use nation as a creative metaphor for a child's imagination, you might want to consider migrating this question over to writers.stackexchange.com
May
4
comment The history and use of the term “moth hour”
@Hugo Huh. So it is.
May
2
comment The history and use of the term “moth hour”
Another thing to keep in mind on using an Ngram is that it will only tell you if the phrase was written down and Google OCR'd it. If the rural Irish were telling time according to flying insects, they probably weren't writing a whole lot of books. But that is more conjecture than fact, so I digress.
May
2
comment The history and use of the term “moth hour”
@JLG The moth hour is at dawn and dusk, or daybreak and twilight, which is a bit more poetic. Americans never used this term, unless they were Irish immigrants who really liked Yeats. Also Yeats did not coin the term. While looking into the Google N-Gram I discovered that the earliest codified usage, according to Google, is an 1839 translation of [Flavius Josephus][1] which refers to the moth hour of the night. [1]: books.google.com/…
May
1
comment Obama's use of “bemused”
Maybe he couldn't decide and invented a portmanteau of bewildered and amused =)
Apr
30
comment American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
Provided my parameters, I think this best addresses the core of question: How to replace bog standard with a better, more easily understood American English phrase. I'm still debating using quintessential versus an extended Brothers Grimm comparison, though. And for all you bog standard fans, I'm still going to use it, just somewhere else in my story. Let the readers Google it, if they have to.
Apr
29
comment American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
@CharlesW I do want that subtle knock that 'bog standard' has. There are lots of phrases on both sides of the Atlantic that mean plain, boring, unexciting, standard or average. But bog standard has a special flavor all it's own. I want the reader in just one or two words get the feeling that she is a straight from The Brothers Grimm standard issue stepmother. She might as well have come stock from the Acme Stepmother Factory in a wooden crate marked "Contents: One Stepmother. This Side Up". -OP
Apr
28
comment American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
Garden varietal, maybe? My garden varietal stepmother...
Apr
28
comment American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
Oooooh! Textbook is officially under consideration now.
Apr
28
comment What is the terminology of the waiting period between two successive harvests?
@kris "The" plant or "A" plant? A fallow field typically has no cash crop growing on it. Instead of leaving an arid, dry field of dirt the rancher/farmer may seed a zero profit field of clover during a fallow season - a useful tactic to avoid soil erosion. The land is still in a rejuvenating fallow stage but there's nothing growing that will make him money. Without further clarification from OP I still like fallow to describe the time between crops because there is no good, useful word or phrase for the time from harvest-to-harvest.
Apr
28
comment What is the terminology of the waiting period between two successive harvests?
@Kris There is not a clear-cut, common use non-archaic word or phrase that indicates the time from harvest-to-harvest. And if there was, most farmers and ranchers wouldn't use it. They might use growing season(s) if it's an annual crop. But there are crops, like hay, that can be harvested multiple times in a season. If you want refer to the time between harvests there's not going to be a good word for that because it's not a useful measurement of time. If you're referring to the time between crops, which is a useful indicator, you can use fallow period or some variation thereof.
Apr
28
comment Is it correct to use quotes before a comma when not representing spoken text?
I agree with Carlo_R: There's no reason to use quotation marks instead of italics unless you're submitting a manuscript for publishing. In that case you use your first example: "stand up", "standup", or "stand-up"? is correct because you're using the quotation marks as a delineation and not as a quotation.
Apr
27
comment What's a gender-neutral way of referring to a nurse?
While these are all gender neutral terms these are too broad to refer specifically to a nurse. These are blanket terms that apply to a wide variety of healthcare workers. Nurse is and should be a gender neutral term.
Apr
26
comment “will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”
@Shoe My comment is not on the strict literal meaning but rather how these phrases could be interpreted by the listener. Without context (which we do not have) Will you be going home this summer? is the one more likely to be strictly inquisitive and Will you go home this summer? is more likely to be taken in the negative. Ex: If I walked up to you at a party and asked, "Will you go home soon?" you are not likely to take it the same as if I asked, "Will you be going home soon?" or "Are you going home soon?" (which is what I find to be most neutral and, therefore, my preferred version).
Apr
24
comment The history and use of the term “moth hour”
@jwpat7 Yes. My source is WB Yeats and the fact I can read and that I've lived in the countryside, albeit not Ireland. Yeats' "The Ballad of Father Gilligan" is just about the only modern source for this phrase. In it the 'moth-hour of eve' is a time before the 'stars begin to peep' implying that the 'moth-hour' is at dusk or twilight. And well after Father Gilligan falls asleep, Yeats refers to dawn or daybreak as the 'time of sparrow chirp/When the moths come once more'. If you've ever been in the countryside at dusk or dawn you'd see why it could be called the 'moth-hour' by rural Irishmen.