324 reputation
311
bio website jedoliver.com
location Chico, CA
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Jul 8 at 4:25

I live in California. I write. I game. I cook. And I'm a Dad.


Apr
26
revised “will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”
added 19 characters in body
Apr
26
answered “will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”
Apr
25
answered A word for showing a bit of anger that you are not satisfied with what is offered?
Apr
25
awarded  Editor
Apr
25
revised Word meaning the act of the state taking away one's right to live
added 129 characters in body
Apr
25
answered Word meaning the act of the state taking away one's right to live
Apr
25
answered How do you say “three times a month” in one word?
Apr
24
awarded  Teacher
Apr
24
comment The history and use of the term “moth hour”
@jwpat7 Yes. My source is WB Yeats and the fact I can read and that I've lived in the countryside, albeit not Ireland. Yeats' "The Ballad of Father Gilligan" is just about the only modern source for this phrase. In it the 'moth-hour of eve' is a time before the 'stars begin to peep' implying that the 'moth-hour' is at dusk or twilight. And well after Father Gilligan falls asleep, Yeats refers to dawn or daybreak as the 'time of sparrow chirp/When the moths come once more'. If you've ever been in the countryside at dusk or dawn you'd see why it could be called the 'moth-hour' by rural Irishmen.
Apr
24
answered The history and use of the term “moth hour”
Apr
22
awarded  Supporter
Apr
22
comment “…who didn't have a…” vs “…without a…”
I would just like to point out to those who closed this as 'off-topic' as it does not meet the requirements of the faq, the first bullet point on the faq says that questions on 'usage, word choice, and grammar' are welcomed here. This is most definitely a question of 'usage, word choice, and grammar' and should not have been closed as off topic. It could have been worded better, but the core question: the advantages and proper usage of "without" versus "didn't have" is a question of 'usage, word choice, and grammar' and should most definitely be welcomed in the English SE.