324 reputation
311
bio website jedoliver.com
location Chico, CA
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Jul 8 at 4:25

I live in California. I write. I game. I cook. And I'm a Dad.


Apr
30
awarded  Scholar
Apr
30
accepted American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
Apr
29
revised American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
added 946 characters in body
Apr
29
awarded  Commentator
Apr
29
comment American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
@CharlesW I do want that subtle knock that 'bog standard' has. There are lots of phrases on both sides of the Atlantic that mean plain, boring, unexciting, standard or average. But bog standard has a special flavor all it's own. I want the reader in just one or two words get the feeling that she is a straight from The Brothers Grimm standard issue stepmother. She might as well have come stock from the Acme Stepmother Factory in a wooden crate marked "Contents: One Stepmother. This Side Up". -OP
Apr
28
comment American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
Garden varietal, maybe? My garden varietal stepmother...
Apr
28
comment American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
Oooooh! Textbook is officially under consideration now.
Apr
28
revised American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
added 590 characters in body
Apr
28
awarded  Student
Apr
28
asked American Equivalent of “Bog Standard”
Apr
28
comment What is the terminology of the waiting period between two successive harvests?
@kris "The" plant or "A" plant? A fallow field typically has no cash crop growing on it. Instead of leaving an arid, dry field of dirt the rancher/farmer may seed a zero profit field of clover during a fallow season - a useful tactic to avoid soil erosion. The land is still in a rejuvenating fallow stage but there's nothing growing that will make him money. Without further clarification from OP I still like fallow to describe the time between crops because there is no good, useful word or phrase for the time from harvest-to-harvest.
Apr
28
comment What is the terminology of the waiting period between two successive harvests?
@Kris There is not a clear-cut, common use non-archaic word or phrase that indicates the time from harvest-to-harvest. And if there was, most farmers and ranchers wouldn't use it. They might use growing season(s) if it's an annual crop. But there are crops, like hay, that can be harvested multiple times in a season. If you want refer to the time between harvests there's not going to be a good word for that because it's not a useful measurement of time. If you're referring to the time between crops, which is a useful indicator, you can use fallow period or some variation thereof.
Apr
28
revised What is the terminology of the waiting period between two successive harvests?
edited body
Apr
28
comment Is it correct to use quotes before a comma when not representing spoken text?
I agree with Carlo_R: There's no reason to use quotation marks instead of italics unless you're submitting a manuscript for publishing. In that case you use your first example: "stand up", "standup", or "stand-up"? is correct because you're using the quotation marks as a delineation and not as a quotation.
Apr
28
answered What is the terminology of the waiting period between two successive harvests?
Apr
27
awarded  Critic
Apr
27
comment What's a gender-neutral way of referring to a nurse?
While these are all gender neutral terms these are too broad to refer specifically to a nurse. These are blanket terms that apply to a wide variety of healthcare workers. Nurse is and should be a gender neutral term.
Apr
26
revised A word for intentionally losing a bet?
added 322 characters in body
Apr
26
answered A word for intentionally losing a bet?
Apr
26
comment “will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”
@Shoe My comment is not on the strict literal meaning but rather how these phrases could be interpreted by the listener. Without context (which we do not have) Will you be going home this summer? is the one more likely to be strictly inquisitive and Will you go home this summer? is more likely to be taken in the negative. Ex: If I walked up to you at a party and asked, "Will you go home soon?" you are not likely to take it the same as if I asked, "Will you be going home soon?" or "Are you going home soon?" (which is what I find to be most neutral and, therefore, my preferred version).