186 reputation
5
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Nov 5 at 15:08

Apr
10
comment Why are foreign words used in modern vernacular?
Huh? 'Compared to another language, say German, we simply don't have the fluidity of vocabulary to make up words'. Well, I'll agree the rules of syntax don't generally allow this in English, but to suggest English doesn't 'make up words' is absurd. It has a much larger vocabulary than any other language.
Feb
25
comment When to use “me” or “myself”?
Recruiters have started to say 'I'd like to talk to yourself about ...'. It drives me nuts. :(
Jan
29
comment “Fall term”, “autumn semester”, “autumn term” or “fall semester”?
Semester is becoming more common a term in British universities too, though term is the normal form.
Jul
31
awarded  Caucus
Jul
2
comment Use of “The better”?
There is a very possible objection. 'Alternative' is from the Latin root 'alter', meaning 'the other', hence 'alternative' as 'the other option/choice'. 'Alternating current' fits this without any problem. The current alternates from one state to the other.
Jul
2
comment Use of “The better”?
There is only ever one alternative. That's what it means- the alternative.
Jun
29
comment Pronunciation of 'host' in Shakespeare's time
@Peter Shor: Thanks, good analysis. Was the source text the first folio?
Jun
29
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
28
awarded  Commentator
Jun
28
comment Pronunciation of 'host' in Shakespeare's time
@AndrewLeach, & FumbleFingers: As a note, the purpose of my question was not any notion of 'correctness', but more how much one can establish pronunciation based on the usage of words in a time when there was no audio-recording. I presumed that was a valid field of academic study. :)
Jun
28
awarded  Student
Jun
28
asked Pronunciation of 'host' in Shakespeare's time
Jun
27
comment Is “To whom could we direct our questions to?” grammatical?
There's a horrible example of this in 'Live and Let Die' But in this ever changing world in which we live in.
Jun
27
comment Is “To whom could we direct our questions to?” grammatical?
'... whom should we ask?'
Jun
27
comment Position of prepositions in questions and clauses
the 'rule' that prepositions should preceded their complement has no real basis: how does one define which rules have a basis, though?
Jun
27
comment Position of prepositions in questions and clauses
You might not often use 'whom', but there are those who still do.
Jun
13
comment Is there a word to make the distinction between a Year/Month Combination and a Month
Have you found any better solution, or invented a word? I need such a word too.
May
23
comment Less versus fewer in time related phrases
I did read that, but the finality of your statement seemed rather much, after all, one could just as well argue that there are no rules in English, we have no equivalent of the Academie Francaise. How does one make a distinction between a 'grammar rule' and 'one man's choice'. Seems rather like the difference between religions and cults. I shall take a look for such a question ;)
May
23
comment Less versus fewer in time related phrases
And 'dividable'?? What's wrong with 'divisable'?
May
23
comment Less versus fewer in time related phrases
You are flawed that the premise is flawed :S. Countable/Non-countable is generally the distinction between 'fewer' and 'less'. Personally, 'fewer' sounds better to me.