283 reputation
27
bio website mootinator.com
location Saskatoon, Canada
age 34
visits member for 4 years
seen Aug 12 at 21:47

Generalist programmer/consultant at Omnilogic Systems

mootinator on Twitter.


Sep
8
comment Karma, Kudos, …?
I like it. You could even make the rewards a list of castable spells for the kids to roll their eyes at. 10 mana - nocturnal shield - This spell makes the caster immune to the bedtime effect for 2 hours
Sep
7
awarded  Scholar
Sep
7
accepted Personal Introductions: “This is” or “These are”
Sep
7
comment Personal Introductions: “This is” or “These are”
I think I like the explanation that it's not incorrect to imply two individuals are part of a singular group "This is Scarlett and Isaiah" (the new team!) as opposed to "These are two distinct individuals". +1 for pointing out why you don't really hear "These are" used to introduce people in conversational English.
Sep
7
comment Personal Introductions: “This is” or “These are”
@John Agreed. This question was written in haste while I was being pressured to go do something more important.
Sep
7
revised Personal Introductions: “This is” or “These are”
Point taken
Sep
7
awarded  Student
Sep
7
asked Personal Introductions: “This is” or “These are”
Dec
29
comment One word for “stealing something on its way to the recipient”
+1 for hijacked because the thievery implication is a bit stronger than intercept.
Dec
29
comment One word for “stealing something on its way to the recipient”
Disagree with your second point. The american football definition of an "intercepted" pass is one which an opposing player caught before it could reach the intended receiver. (The thing the OP asked for.) A "fumbled" pass would have reached the intended receiver before being dropped. To me "hijacked" implies an illegal activity, whereas intercepted does not necessarily.
Sep
12
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
Sep
8
comment Where does the phrase “run code” or “run software” come from? Why “run”?
@FumbleFingers Thanks. My point was that a computer isn't doing anything significantly different when it "runs a program" as opposed to when it is simply "running".
Sep
8
comment Where does the phrase “run code” or “run software” come from? Why “run”?
In my mind, a machine is normally just running an "instruction loop" an engineer "programmed" using physics, the only difference is the level of abstraction. When a computer is "running" it's either processing instructions or waiting for instructions to process. When you give it new instructions, it "runs" those.
Sep
7
answered Where does the phrase “run code” or “run software” come from? Why “run”?
Sep
6
awarded  Teacher
Jul
3
comment Why is “idea” sometimes pronounced as “idear”?
@Marcin Indeed. I heard a radio ad for a car warsh last time I drove through Montana.
Mar
1
comment Should this abbreviated question use “lose” or “lost?”
It seems irrelevant that it could be ambiguous when one of the options is: (Would you like to) have something universally undesirable happen?
Jan
19
awarded  Editor