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 Yearling
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Apr
13
comment Term for a doorway without a door
What if it's a jar??
Apr
13
comment Term for a doorway without a door
Hobbit hole? People port?
Feb
9
comment Difference between “safe” and “secure”
I can secure the elephants from the poachers, making the elephants safe from poachers.
Feb
9
comment Difference between “safe” and “secure”
If you are playing tag or hide and go seek, when you get to "base" you are "safe", meaning no longer at risk of being tagged. No one would ever say " I got home secure!" or "you need to secure my baby from that burning building!" Or "someone please secure me!" Meanwhile, if you are mounting a platform to a wall, you wouldn't check if it was properly safe to the wall, you'd be securing it. You secure a tree house to a tree so that your kids are safe when they are inside of it. Safe means you are out of harms way. Secure means reliable, ensured, stable.
Jul
19
awarded  Yearling
Jun
30
comment “adjective noun noun”: which noun does the adjective refer to (“electrical system operators”)
Using strong grammar and punctuation does not just prevent ambiguity (which may be unlikely to a native speaker, and aided by simple common sense and context), it also improves the clarity, rhythm, and resonance of both written and spoken prose. I was looking up lyrics to a silly song the other day and noticed the line: "And the tears upon the pillow that I shed". Obviously nobody is going to think the singer is shedding pillows, but that kind of clunkiness is what separates clever wordplay from accidental ambiguity, and timeless, poignant prose from a forgettable pop song.
Jun
30
comment “adjective noun noun”: which noun does the adjective refer to (“electrical system operators”)
See my update. There are tons of official resources on this topic.
Jun
30
revised “adjective noun noun”: which noun does the adjective refer to (“electrical system operators”)
added 222 characters in body; deleted 8 characters in body
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Aug
29
comment What does “don’t pave the cow path” mean in this context?
Manhattan adopted a grid plan in 1811. The rising popularity after the civil war would be because there was a boom of new cities and plenty of land to work with, versus, say, Baltimore, which is water locked in nearly all directions
May
23
answered How to define someone who does not like/want to get a job or do anything in life?
Apr
16
awarded  Yearling
Aug
29
comment Is this an example of extrapolation?
Is the distinction between the two that extrapolation suggests an independent or original idea or inference based on given data, while induction is more like filling in the missing piece, but there is only the one right answer to be filled in?
Aug
29
answered Is this an example of extrapolation?
Aug
29
comment “One-to-one” vs. “one-on-one”
@Mitch - Face-on-Face has a definite connotation. And one-to-one, as Shyam mentioned, is transactional, not interactive. You make a one-to-one comparison between objects, or you make a one-to-one trade, or in a database, table A has a one-to-one relationship with table B (meaning that a row in table A can only link to one row at any given time in table B and vice versa). If someone said to me, "Let's have a one-to-one conversation" I would think they were either a robot, foreign, or expected me to say exactly the same thing they said back to them each time, so that each sentence matched.
Apr
19
answered Opposite of 'Midas touch'?
Apr
19
comment Opposite of 'Midas touch'?
"I'm like King Midas in reverse, here. Everything I touch turns to shit." -- Tony Soprano
Apr
19
comment Difference between “shake”, “tremor”, “shiver”, “tremble”
That I will agree with, but only because I've become uncomfortably aware of that personally in the past few months. But that's a tremble more than a tremor, I'd say.
Apr
19
awarded  Critic
Apr
19
awarded  Commentator