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2d
answered What does “they were taken for being taken in” mean?
2d
answered Is “to silo off” a real phrase?
2d
comment Does “wobble” sound negative?
@Mari-LouA, that almost qualifies as TMI, but I can't help smiling about it! In fact, I'm grinning from ear to ear. LMAO. I'm going to tell my new wife all about you -- she's got a quirky sense of humour, too.
Apr
16
awarded  Yearling
Apr
13
answered Help for literature school work
Apr
13
answered Smb helped smb reached smth
Apr
12
revised A word for persons who won't advance or improve
Added punctuation, corrected sentence structure
Apr
11
comment Meaning of “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”
Greg Lee, that is an excellent answer. But it is something I would call a pseudo-answer, and made me laugh, too. It has the same flavor with respect to the question that the review had to do with the restaurant. And perhaps you have captured the reviewer's intent precisely!
Apr
11
comment Tense when speaking of someone in your past.
That's an interesting observation and probably good advice, but it doesn't answer the question, or even address it.
Apr
8
comment What does “dangling off turrets” mean here?
Oh, it is, @HotLicks, it is! :-)
Apr
8
comment How can I explain to people that the phrase “off of ” is grammatically incorrect?
@EdwinAshworth I actually understood this -- my comment was trying to be tongue-in-cheek, too. Perhaps I should have included a smiley emoticon? :-) What, by the way, is Beaker-speak?
Apr
8
answered what does “preceding warfare” means?
Apr
8
answered What does “dangling off turrets” mean here?
Apr
8
comment How can I explain to people that the phrase “off of ” is grammatically incorrect?
@EdwinAshworth, perhaps you meant to write "borrowed" instead of loaned? We didn't loan any words from the Greeks, et al. And I do wonder at the term borrow in this context, because we don't ever intend to give them back, lol! Perhaps incorporated from would be a better phrase? Or even more likely, I'm overthinking it. Since Herb has borrowed many items from Dagwood and still has them after all these years, maybe borrowed is, after all, appropriate. Hmmmm.
Apr
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
1
answered “Can you tell me what this is?” or “[…] what is this?”
Apr
1
comment Proverb about cultural differences
@ToddWilcox - The first recorded instance of this expression, that I have heard of, at least, was by Muhammed Ali in 1966. I am assuming, perhaps unjustifiably, that it was something prevalent in that milieu in which he grew up. wordwizard.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=20582
Apr
1
comment Proverb about cultural differences
Apology not needed! It was just friendly advice! After a bit I will delete my comments... no need to make this part of the historical record. :-)
Apr
1
comment Proverb about cultural differences
It might be useful to read previous answers to avoid duplication. Just FYI.
Mar
31
answered Proverb about cultural differences