4,707 reputation
631
bio website cyberherbalist.wordpress.com
location Olympia, Washington state
age 63
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 9 hours ago

Who, Me?

I am a .NET C# developer, I started out as a mainframe COBOL programmer back in 1987. Transitioned to VB6 in 2000, .NET when Visual Studio 1.0 was in Beta2. Now working in ASP.NET, Windows Phone 7.

Twitter: @Cyberherbalist

Blogs: see my website

profile for Cyberherbalist on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


9h
comment Is there a proper term to describe 1/3 of a year (4 months)
@Alenanno I love it that an Italian has never heard the "When in Rome" thing! You might find it interesting that the phrase first occurs (in Latin) in the writings of St. Ambrose in the 4th Century: en.wiktionary.org/wiki/when_in_Rome,_do_as_the_Romans_do
10h
comment What do you call those two strands coming out of the electric capacitors?
That is a particular kind of capacitor, called an electrolytic capacitor. Electrolytics come in other packages, as well, including cylinders with the axial leads or at the ends of the cylinder. And for all you guys trying to call these wires "terminals" or "legs", please don't. A "terminal" is a fixed connection point to which you attach "leads". Only a complete amateur would call these "legs". Trust me, before I was a programmer I used to be a professional electronics technician.
10h
comment What do you call those two strands coming out of the electric capacitors?
@Mayken, I've never seen a "bipolar transistor"! Can you treat the condition with some kind of electrical stimulation?
Oct
3
comment Is using a comma as a pause correct?
Except that he lists his location as the US, so I stand corrected.
Oct
3
comment Is using a comma as a pause correct?
Yes, that works for a native speaker, but I am under the impression that Xogle is not one. His examples bear this out.
Oct
2
comment Is using a comma as a pause correct?
@Xogle : I edited to provide this.
Oct
2
answered Is using a comma as a pause correct?
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
30
answered “I actually might have to X” vs. “I might actually have to X” vs. “I might have to actually X”
Sep
30
comment Attorney at law, is there any other kind?
It might also be related to the word that means "to twist", and some attorneys are very good at this.
Sep
30
comment Is “pass peach seeds” an idiom or just a figurative expression?
It would be easy to pass peach seeds, as they are quite small and more rounded than the pit or stone which surrounds them. To see a peach seed, simply take a nutcracker to the peach pit or stone, and you will find the seed inside.
Sep
24
comment Where and when did the phrase “turkey of the year” originate?
Just what I said, @user463240. Not offensive if there were a good relationship between the two persons, and they were accustomed to trading mild insults as part of socialization. I have friends who might greet me in this way and I would not be offended at all. There are others who might use such a greeting and I would not be pleased one bit. I am saying that it is not INHERENTLY offensive, but whether it is depends upon multiple factors, such as the nature of the relationship, tone of voice, and so on.
Sep
24
answered Where and when did the phrase “turkey of the year” originate?
Sep
23
comment Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?
@DavidRicherby Having been a Yank living in Britain for a time, many years ago, I noticed that those Brits who spoke of visiting the US did so most frequently by saying they were "going to the States", not "abroad" nor "overseas". Of course, "the States" is not a vague destination, whereas if someone were making a world-girdling trip they would have to be vague, and "going abroad" would work well.
Sep
23
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
23
revised Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?
spelling in question
Sep
23
answered Equivalent word for 'overseas' for a non-island country?
Sep
22
comment What word is similar to inculcation, but one that the ordinary people would understand
So, you're an old guy, just like me! I can't remember speaking this word, ever, until today. I'm sure I've done it, it was just too long ago, and probably when I was reading something out loud. I can see why he needed an alternative. And I love the word instill -- it is so very calm and gentle!
Sep
22
comment What word is similar to inculcation, but one that the ordinary people would understand
I suppose inculcate could have a positive connotation, but the dictionary definitions I've seen tend to emphasize the negative connotations. @HowardPautz's instill suggests a more positive and gentle aspect, in and of itself, of training or teaching. And "rote" has its place even among instillation: memorization of poems; learning scripts word-for-word as an actor in a play.
Sep
22
comment What word is similar to inculcation, but one that the ordinary people would understand
Well, yes, indoctrinate does have a somewhat negative connotation. This is why I suggested it in the place of inculcation, which likewise has a negative connotation.