4,474 reputation
628
bio website cyberherbalist.wordpress.com
location Olympia, Washington state
age 62
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 6 hours ago

Who, Me?

I am a .NET C# developer, I started out as a mainframe COBOL programmer back in 1987. Transitioned to VB6 in 2000, .NET when Visual Studio 1.0 was in Beta2. Now working in ASP.NET, Windows Phone 7.

Twitter: @Cyberherbalist

Blogs: see my website

profile for Cyberherbalist on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


6h
comment Is a “Tale” less factual than a “Story”?
@JoeBlow, not just canvassing opinions - looking for a good reason to go with one in preference to the other.
9h
asked Is a “Tale” less factual than a “Story”?
2d
comment Why are Leicester & co pronounced as they are?
German agglutinates like crazy and does not follow your rule. On the other hand, what on earth does this have to do with the Question? BG, I mean no offense, but this "answer" is more a blog post than a StackExchange participation.
2d
comment Why are Leicester & co pronounced as they are?
It's interesting that the place names would derive from Roman camps (which even in temporary use tended to be very well-constructed), and today in the United States there are many cities which grew up around permanent military posts, many of which no longer feature the posts, but the names persist: Fort Wayne (Indiana); Fort Worth (Texas); Fort Collins (Colorado); and many more.
2d
comment What is this symbol called
Well, it's the symbol for the Euro currency, but what is the context in which it appears? You should provide part of the text in which it occurs -- for all we know, it might just be a typographical error.
2d
comment how to respond when boss says sorry to disturb you
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about workplace etiquette and human relations.
Sep
18
comment Stealing the topic from another person when he or she is going to tell you something
Ha! @LightnessRacesinOrbit detected an instance of the "No True Scotsman" fallacy! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_true_Scotsman
Sep
18
revised Literature: 'Why' at the beginning of sentences
Added content
Sep
18
comment What's the correct form of the negative subjunctive?
Sometimes, @DanBron, the comments are more interesting than the question OR the answer. This is one of those times.
Sep
18
comment Literature: 'Why' at the beginning of sentences
Warum? Darum! Sorry, couldn't stop myself.
Sep
18
answered Literature: 'Why' at the beginning of sentences
Sep
18
comment What's the correct form of the negative subjunctive?
Somebody please answer the question. @DanBron I am talking to you. :-)
Sep
18
comment “There was a man known as the 'Toe Suck Fairy'” — is “there” a complement?
Good to know! I am not sure where you get the idea that a reduced relative clause is an adjective clause. I'm fairly sure it is not. Check this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reduced_relative_clause If you have a better source about it being adjectival, I'd like to see it.
Sep
18
comment “There was a man known as the 'Toe Suck Fairy'” — is “there” a complement?
@Araucaria you may have a point. I read it differently the first time through. If you read JanusBahsJacquet's comment to the question that actually answers the question completely. deelea seems to be saying something only partly correct. There are two clauses (one of them a reduced relative), and thus two verbs, "was" and "known", one in each clause. I also have a friend (male) named Dee, but that's because he doesn't like his given name. I suppose we could be faced here with Dee Lea, which is ambiguous as to gender. :-)
Sep
18
comment “There was a man known as the 'Toe Suck Fairy'” — is “there” a complement?
No, deelea, you have not misunderstood. You got it exactly right.
Sep
18
comment “There was a man known as the 'Toe Suck Fairy'” — is “there” a complement?
@Araucaria I don't know that deelea is female, but in English it is normally a female name (Delia). I had a great aunt named Delia. Most males I know don't use female user names. "known" is a verb and it is the predicate of the relative clause "who is known as the "blah blah blah". Without the "who is" it is a reduced relative, and it is not the opposite of what deelea is saying.
Sep
18
comment Is it wrong for a then clause to follow a since clause?
@BCLC I have the same problem as you in programming. I am a programmer after all, and my favorite language, C#, eschews "then". I started out in COBOL and transitioned over to Basic; both of these use "if/then", optionally in the case of COBOL. On very rare occasions I find myself trying to write "if (catIsOutOfBag) then"!
Sep
18
comment “There was a man known as the 'Toe Suck Fairy'” — is “there” a complement?
It is a reduced relative clause. That's what she is saying. and as @JanusBahsJacquet said in a comment.
Sep
17
comment Is it wrong for a then clause to follow a since clause?
@BCLC see my edited answer. I could say "Because burgers are edible, they can be eaten", omitting the "then", and it would be assumed. It's correct, and probably more prevalent than "since" in this context. I can even omit the "then" in the "if" statement: "If burgers are edible, they can be eaten."
Sep
17
revised Is it wrong for a then clause to follow a since clause?
added 323 characters in body