4,144 reputation
627
bio website cyberherbalist.wordpress.com
location Olympia, Washington state
age 62
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 7 hours ago

Who, Me?

I am a .NET C# developer, I started out as a mainframe COBOL programmer back in 1987. Transitioned to VB6 in 2000, .NET when Visual Studio 1.0 was in Beta2. Now working in ASP.NET, Windows Phone 7.

Twitter: @Cyberherbalist

Blogs: see my website

profile for Cyberherbalist on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


12h
comment Does this situation constitute a “Pyrrhic Victory”? Irony?
Interesting that your original link to "Pyrrhic Victory" was misspelled, and still found its way to the proper entry on Free Dictionary.
12h
revised Does this situation constitute a “Pyrrhic Victory”? Irony?
spelling
1d
answered Does this situation constitute a “Pyrrhic Victory”? Irony?
1d
comment Capitalisation of geographical entities in lists
Downvoter should comment.
1d
answered Capitalisation of geographical entities in lists
1d
comment idioms that mean being good at something
Yes, it is, @JoeBlow. Answers can still be given as comments, so all is not lost. But honestly, the question still falls afoul of the standards for questions.
1d
comment idioms that mean being good at something
That is true, @FumbleFingers. My bad. And thanks for the laugh-inducing comment! You have a way with words; I'd love to meet you one fine day. Unlikely however, with the Atlantic and the entire continental US standing in the way. :-)
1d
answered idioms that mean being good at something
1d
comment idioms that mean being good at something
Yes, @FumbleFingers, But it's a nice "list" question! I am interested in the answers. Quick people, answer this before it gets closed!
Aug
14
revised If “clearly evident” is redundant, what word or phrase suggests being indisputable but not readily apparent?
Changed links from mobile version to standard
Aug
14
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
11
comment Is it redundant to say that something is “clearly evident”?
@EdwinAshworth: So? I'm sorry, but I don't see your point. Unless you're arguing that the dictionary needs to be reduced to just one word per meaning, for sake of simplicity. May I not say that something is "very clear" instead of merely "clear"? "Clear" is very clear in its meaning, after all. Isn't any form of emphasis redundant then?
Aug
11
comment Is it redundant to say that something is “clearly evident”?
@medica - I'm not saying that every modifier is applicable to evident. That would be ridiculous. But it seems there is a small set of modifiers which would be appropriate. That, to me, is "very evident". To you, it is "less evident".
Aug
11
answered Is it redundant to say that something is “clearly evident”?
Aug
11
comment What is the “‑cide” word for killing one’s husband?
@sgroves: that's the generic. What is asked for is the answer to this question: "Wife is to husband as uxoricide is to ______".
Aug
11
comment 'Closest Healing' or another phrase for a book title?
@J.R.: Did Jung just take your comment seriously? I believe he did! And I am not sure how to react to that. Although I am near to laughing my ahem off.
Aug
8
comment 'Closest Healing' or another phrase for a book title?
@J.R. - Snidely done, sir (or madam)!
Aug
7
answered 'Closest Healing' or another phrase for a book title?
Jul
21
comment Why is it “have someone wrapped around your LITTLE finger”?
No, I can't cite a source, @user78469. That's simply how I have always understood the meaning of this idiom. In short, it's my opinion.