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Oct
21
comment What's the difference in meaning between “evidence” and “proof”?
The continued answers on this question has reminded me that various disciplines do indeed play with the meaning of proof and theory, usually to facilitate discourse. In law, proof may oft mean as digitig & ornello describe; A scientific theory is often taken as fact, though are still not quite 100% immutable, e.g. the big bang theory which was created as a prediction of the standard model. But the SM is only based on our imperfect observations and also predicts dark, matter, dark energy and dark flow, of which a lot of scientists are still very sceptical of.. remember 'aether'?
Oct
21
comment Is there a single word or phrase to describe a context-less option for “manual” or “automatic”?
Yes, currently it's boolean, but if you want scope to change in the future, then in the future it will not be boolean and the term used should either allow for that (good), or be changed as the enum values are changed (not good). Generally it is known that a variable of a singular type, be it enum or integer or float, will only hold one value, i.e. your enum can be automatic or manual or semi, just as an integer can be 5 or 6 or 7. The control suggestion by @chiastic-security is a good one.
Oct
21
comment Is there a single word or phrase to describe a context-less option for “manual” or “automatic”?
The example could possibly be adjusted to soleTransmissionType, but I feel this would be linguistically cumbersome and clumsy in the context of programming.
Oct
21
comment Is there a single word or phrase to describe a context-less option for “manual” or “automatic”?
Then the situation is changed, the transmission type is not really mutually exclusive in the sense that it can only ever be one or the other, but one or another. Which is true of any variable: at any given point it will have only one value. Thus I would recommend that the name not include the type of the flag, only what it is for, e.g. transmissionType. The working of which could/should then be made clear through documentation where this could be detailed in a clearer manner.
Oct
9
comment Why is the word “Holy” used before swear words?
@Raestloz Hell's bells Batman!
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
I don't know of a particular rule exactly for this other than choosing the preposition according to meaning, i.e. beneath vs over
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
However some prepositions may be synonyms such as the previous latter phrase and "the book is under the table". Obviously replacing the inanimate objects in the examples, as if we were describing a hierarchy of some sort (e.g. an office structure) and replaced "book" with "man" and "table" with "woman", there are immediate connotations other than those intended. But the grammatical correctness does not change. Just as there may be with "with", "to" or "and" for your marriage example.
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
@zakgottlieb while prepositions may be grammatically equal, their meanings still need to be taken into account, for example "the book is above the table" is as grammatically correct as "the book is beneath the table", though of course the meaning is different.
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
@zakgottlieb to more directly answer your comment; either is equally acceptable grammatically, as is the conjunction that J.R. proposed in his comment on your OP.
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
BE does usually differ, though we do use both, usually the invitation is to "celebrate the marriage". A BE example would depend on who is doing the inviting, one of the couple's parents, or the couple themselves. Here are some examples that use "marriage" an either "to" or "and" :itsawrapweddings.co.uk/images/invitation-wording.pdf
Mar
6
comment Helping improve or help To improve
The posts in the question Andrew has linked to should answer the question but I would emphasise the common usage difference between US and GB English.
Mar
6
comment Helping improve or help To improve
Though the latter is more correct, depending on context the former could also be used. Could you provide more info on how the phrase is to be used?
Jan
10
comment What word means “the sights, things, and activities that are special” in a place?
I'd recommend this too, but "features" may be a viable alternative
Jul
4
comment Using “inter alia” in non-legal language?
my 2C Ive never heard it outside of legalese
Apr
25
comment Which definition of commitment is correct in this sentence?
Jennifer is correct however those involved could possibly take different meanings themselves. For example, the manager may intend to show enthusiasm for helping local residents, whereas the residents may hope that the manager intends to deliver resources such as money.
Apr
25
comment British English - “In two hours time”
2 cents use case: If I was writing in a rigid formal style, say for a academic paper I would probably use "time", but would otherwise not generally use it
Apr
17
comment Meaning of “stop for something”
please see answer by @Hellion as his is a good explanation
Apr
16
comment What exactly is “verbal irony”
from my own understanding I would say that sarcasm is in the strictest sense a type of caustic humour or sharp, bitter remark though not necessarily saying the opposite of something. Whereas verbal irony is not necessarily humourous but is the opposite of the intended meaning.