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seen Jul 25 at 10:31

Mar
25
answered “Synced” or “synched”
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
I don't know of a particular rule exactly for this other than choosing the preposition according to meaning, i.e. beneath vs over
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
However some prepositions may be synonyms such as the previous latter phrase and "the book is under the table". Obviously replacing the inanimate objects in the examples, as if we were describing a hierarchy of some sort (e.g. an office structure) and replaced "book" with "man" and "table" with "woman", there are immediate connotations other than those intended. But the grammatical correctness does not change. Just as there may be with "with", "to" or "and" for your marriage example.
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
@zakgottlieb while prepositions may be grammatically equal, their meanings still need to be taken into account, for example "the book is above the table" is as grammatically correct as "the book is beneath the table", though of course the meaning is different.
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
@zakgottlieb to more directly answer your comment; either is equally acceptable grammatically, as is the conjunction that J.R. proposed in his comment on your OP.
Jun
10
comment When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
BE does usually differ, though we do use both, usually the invitation is to "celebrate the marriage". A BE example would depend on who is doing the inviting, one of the couple's parents, or the couple themselves. Here are some examples that use "marriage" an either "to" or "and" :itsawrapweddings.co.uk/images/invitation-wording.pdf
Jun
9
answered “Spoon feed” vs. “spoonfeed”
Jun
9
answered When writing “The Marriage Of,” which preposition is correct?
May
21
awarded  Yearling
Mar
30
awarded  Commentator
Mar
6
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
6
comment Helping improve or help To improve
The posts in the question Andrew has linked to should answer the question but I would emphasise the common usage difference between US and GB English.
Mar
6
comment Helping improve or help To improve
Though the latter is more correct, depending on context the former could also be used. Could you provide more info on how the phrase is to be used?
Mar
6
awarded  Critic
Jan
10
answered Sentence case in a message
Jan
10
comment What word means “the sights, things, and activities that are special” in a place?
I'd recommend this too, but "features" may be a viable alternative
Jul
4
comment Using “inter alia” in non-legal language?
my 2C Ive never heard it outside of legalese
Jun
25
answered What is the term for the part of a jingle that states the company name?
Jun
6
answered “when you are done” vs. “when you are through” vs. “when you are finished”
Apr
25
comment Which definition of commitment is correct in this sentence?
Jennifer is correct however those involved could possibly take different meanings themselves. For example, the manager may intend to show enthusiasm for helping local residents, whereas the residents may hope that the manager intends to deliver resources such as money.